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Mine are taller than me but no flowers yet
167947


167948


Tomatoes are still hanging on...

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Tiller project done .....Engine, and entire machine, runs and operates great ...

Here is the finished product ....
finished this frankenstein 928 today. used 6-7 machines to build this one. Bucket, augers, chassis, engine,handlebars, and more was from different machines.

glad it's done.
Great work on the machines, guys! onacer, that probably looks better than new. And orangputeh, wow, combining that many machines? That sounds like a process by itself.

I think I made progress on my little tiller's carb tonight. Replaced the tank plug and the fuel lines, that didn't do much. Tuning was still inconsistent. Sprayed some carb cleaner where the carb mounts to the engine, while running, and it died. Interesting, that gasket looked good to me, but apparently it was leaking. I replaced that gasket and tried again, now spraying there doesn't affect the engine. So I think I'm getting a good seal.

Re-tuned it, it seemed more consistent this time. I put the tines on, tried chewing some dirt, including re-tuning the high end with it under a load. It was still 4-stroking a bit under a load, so I think that's good/safe.

I think it's doing better, but I'll re-check tomorrow, when the engine's cold. But I think I'm at least better understanding the situation, at least, and I'm learning about symptoms and causes.
 

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got lab work results back from dr. prediabetic. maybe that explains my sluggishness the whole damn year.
 

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got lab work results back from dr. prediabetic. maybe that explains my sluggishness the whole damn year.
I am prediabetic, as well. For the last 10 or so years. Cut out the beer, replace with water and start a exercise regimen, even if it's cutting the grass with a push mower or something of the like. Get out, get moving, eat more greens. I bounce back and forth in that zone, as well. After I do those things, it gets better. Then I buy another 20 pack of Labatt, drink 3 with dinner, ice cream for dessert and start falling asleep before the dinner dishes are off the table again! So back to the water and exercise.It is easy to blame sluggishness on anything but getting old, ain't it?
 

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Diabetes is a disease of the fat man. You just need to get back to your college weight. I've had good results by logging what I eat every day on a site called "CalorieKing." So far, it has helped me lose 20 lbs. this year. I need to lose another 25 lbs. to get back to my college weight. Get a scale and weigh in every morning at the same time. Pre-diabetic is not that serious, but it's a wake-up call. That's one reason why I keep working on losing the weight.
 

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Sorry to hear about that, orangputeh. A friend at work got a similar diagnosis a few years ago. He set up a treadmill at home, and took steps including diet changes, and exercise, and lost a lot of weight. He feels better, and the prediabetic diagnosis went away.

I'm not trying to say his steps were easy, he put in a bunch of work. But he was able to change that path, and improve his situation. I'm sure it's also helped his cardiovascular health too.
 

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Observations and thoughts.
So I was able to get more time with the 017 tiller this afternoon. There's a couple more things(advantages) I noticed when compared to a gas FT tiller. One is small surface roots, especially the type from evergreens. These furry surface roots can tend to load up on the tines and they require manual removal. With the electric motor I can literally use the trigger as an indexer as opposed to gas which I'd shut off before attempting root untangling, It really speeds things up when you can index the tines safely and quietly.
Another observation is just the overall feel (feedback) of the work being performed. With the electric there is no vibration and not much noise other than that coming from the business end. I can start to make out obstructions and differentiate them just by the sound and feel of the tines. I can tell the difference between a log or a root or gravel or a stone or a buried paver or brick just by the sound, and can tell whats ok to keep going or what needs to be removed first, much easier than with noisy gas.
This thing is very useful for disposing of rotten firewood, just throw them right on the compost pile and they instantly pulverize to dust and soil.
This all makes me want to attempt to hook up my spare 3hp farm duty motor onto the 10000 series tractor.
 

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Outdoor Power Equipment as lawn art! Saw these on Route 118 in Waterford, Maine...

View attachment 167973

View attachment 167974
Man, old equipment had such beautiful compound curve and corner sheet metal work, the jellybean look is the mark of craftsmanship and attention to detail. Even if the technology wasn't at post modern levels, the brute strength and artisan level of industrial design were never skimped. Never an afterthought.
 

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Cool, the tiller sounds good! I debated something like a SunJoe electric, but ended up going a different direction. The idea of the cord didn't really bother me, but it seemed like most don't have reversible tines, which is an idea that sounded good to me. But the torque of an electric (with no clutch to slip) sounded nice, as well as just plugging it and starting work.

I spent, well, probably too-long messing with the little Mantis carb this week. Last night I think I got it running pretty well. Turns out it's tricky to feel when these needles are seated (they had limiter caps, and there are no springs under them to prevent vibrating loose, so the threads themselves are fairly tight), but once I started with a reasonable setting, I was more successful tuning the low end.

I'm still having an issue with it not wanting to stay idling once it's hot. I suspect it leans out a bit once it's hot, so maybe I need to richen the Low screw slightly. I can see why people with the Honda 4-stroke version say that engine is simpler to deal with :) The 2-stroke seems rather finicky.

I tilled the main areas that I want to get done, it worked well! Last night I had the tines set to the less-aggressive Cultivating position, so the teeth are pointing "away" from the rotation direction. So it doesn't catch as much on roots, etc, since the teeth push them away, vs grabbing them. This morning I flipped them around to the Tilling direction, so the teeth try to dig in and grab. I got stuck on some roots, but it worked faster this way, which was nice.

This is how it did in one area last night. I thought it did a good job. It should be a helpful tool to have available.
By driveway.jpg
 

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Hey Red, looks like you're getting the hang of your Mantis tiller. I love the one I have, over 20 years old, and is great at chopping up the soil in prep for planting. And yeah, the carb is a bit finicky, but it runs well.

tx
 
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Cool, the tiller sounds good! I debated something like a SunJoe electric, but ended up going a different direction. The idea of the cord didn't really bother me, but it seemed like most don't have reversible tines, which is an idea that sounded good to me. But the torque of an electric (with no clutch to slip) sounded nice, as well as just plugging it and starting work.

I spent, well, probably too-long messing with the little Mantis carb this week. Last night I think I got it running pretty well. Turns out it's tricky to feel when these needles are seated (they had limiter caps, and there are no springs under them to prevent vibrating loose, so the threads themselves are fairly tight), but once I started with a reasonable setting, I was more successful tuning the low end.

I'm still having an issue with it not wanting to stay idling once it's hot. I suspect it leans out a bit once it's hot, so maybe I need to richen the Low screw slightly. I can see why people with the Honda 4-stroke version say that engine is simpler to deal with :) The 2-stroke seems rather finicky.

I tilled the main areas that I want to get done, it worked well! Last night I had the tines set to the less-aggressive Cultivating position, so the teeth are pointing "away" from the rotation direction. So it doesn't catch as much on roots, etc, since the teeth push them away, vs grabbing them. This morning I flipped them around to the Tilling direction, so the teeth try to dig in and grab. I got stuck on some roots, but it worked faster this way, which was nice.

This is how it did in one area last night. I thought it did a good job. It should be a helpful tool to have available.
View attachment 167976
Oh yeah that thing is a little ripper. But should it keep acting up don't let the lack of reverse dissuade you. The electric is so easy to use and can truly operate in any position, that I'm pondering whether I can use it to do some light excavation to correct some ground water issues.
 

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Maybe I should have worded that better. I'm not referring to whether the tines themselves can rotate in a different direction. Like, pushing the machine backwards, vs pulling it forwards.

The Mantis always turns the shaft in the same direction, pulling the machine forward. But the tines themselves can be flipped around, so the angled teeth either rotate "away" from the ground (cultivating), or so they are angled "towards" ground ground, digging in more aggressively (tilling).

The picture below is from their manual, to try and help show it better than my explanation.

It's also nice that the tines come off by just pulling a cotter pin. So if something gets wrapped around them, pull the pin, slide the tines off, and unwrap them.

It's not a perfect machine, but there are some nice features. I'd be curious to try the dethatcher attachment, as another option to loosen the surface of yard areas. I have a pull-behind dethatcher for my tractor, but those just drag along, vs spinning, like these. I have the edger attachment, which I've gotten to try a bit.

And HillnGullyRider, I have thought about alternate uses, since it seems good at digging. A friend had to dig a long, narrow trench through his yard. If I'd had it at the time, I think it could have done a nice job of loosening the soil for him, vs digging it out when it's all intact. There was a SunJoe on FB Marketplace that I almost bought, but held off, as the price wasn't much lower than new.

Mantis, Cultivating vs Tilling.jpg
 

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The 017 works the same way, cotter pin removal that can be separated into 4 parts, reversible, plus I think there are verticut blades and an edger blade available so it could cut more like a Mantis as opposed to a bent tine tiller. I bet Snow Joe has a similar option.

Leaving the blades on and indexing seems much faster to me though, unless really tangled.
 

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And HillnGullyRider, I have thought about alternate uses, since it seems good at digging. A friend had to dig a long, narrow trench through his yard. If I'd had it at the time, I think it could have done a nice job of loosening the soil for him, vs digging it out when it's all intact.
I buy these old sawmill blades, they are like a solid dado or jointer blades 3/4-1" thick but with non-replaceable teeth, they are sharp and cheap, heavy. Only a few times more expensive than an edger blade. I wonder if I could make a light duty stump grinder for shrubbery and tall hedge stumps? Would the gearcase handle it? I was also thinking about making an index plate to turn the gearbox horizontal or on the diagonal, and then installing a saw blade to take down saplings and such.
 

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I bet Snow Joe has a similar option.

Leaving the blades on and indexing seems much faster to me though, unless really tangled.
Disappointingly, reading through the Snow Joe manuals (I think it's actually Sun Joe, sorry), I didn't see mentions of alternate tines, just what comes with them. And nothing about reversing those, as I recall.

Sorry, not sure what you mean by indexing them?

This has an axle sticking out to each side, with a "D" machined into the end. The "D" engages with a mactching shape on the tine assembly, to transfer torque. The cotter pin only makes sure the tine doesn't fall off the axle. It's not like the shear bolt on a snowblower, where the shear bolt is actually transferring torque.

So you pull the pin, slip the tine off the exposed axle, and unwind whatever is stuck on the tine, or between it and the gearbox. Slide it back on, and reinstall the pin.

I buy these old sawmill blades, they are like a solid dado or jointer blades 3/4-1" thick but with non-replaceable teeth, they are sharp and cheap, heavy. Only a few times more expensive than an edger blade. I wonder if I could make a light duty stump grinder for shrubbery and tall hedge stumps? Would the gearcase handle it? I was also thinking about making an index plate to turn the gearbox horizontal or on the diagonal, and then installing a saw blade to take down saplings and such.
That's a very cool idea. Last year I was trying to think about "DIY" stump-grinding methods, and didn't come up with much. Or at least, nothing practical/safe.

But if you could get a wide blade, and mount it to something with substantial torque, that could be interesting. Heck, take an old 2-stage blower, and modify the auger to mount 1 or 2 blades like that, cutting back much of the bucket. Then bring that onto the stump, and see what happens. Of course, "what happens" might just be blowing the gearbox/shear bolts as soon as the blade catches on something :)
 

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I'm still having an issue with it not wanting to stay idling once it's hot. I suspect it leans out a bit once it's hot, so maybe I need to richen the Low screw slightly. I can see why people with the Honda 4-stroke version say that engine is simpler to deal with :) The 2-stroke seems rather finicky.
if it is leaning out i would wonder if there is an air leak somewhere. could maybe be a seal or who know. you would likely have to pressure test the block to try finding it but i would guess since it is more of an issue when you ad heat it may or may not be easy to test. that is definitely part of why the 4 stroke versions are nicer. crank case leak doesn't effect how the engine runs on them.

got the oil changed on the snowblowers. got my nephew to do most of the work. he did pretty good on the 1 machine but kind of messed up on the other machine. he only put 500ml of oil in it which told him was a good starting point. oil was at least visible on the dipstick even tho it was in the add area. oh well i still got to get him to pull the cover off the machine again. seems like the coil on it may be bad and may get him to do a bit other work when i get him to take it apart and test/fix things. also got a gas powered scooter sold. had it listed for less than 24 hours and had it sold with a ton of people who were interested.
 

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sold a honda 622 today. strange beltless machine that i think was built in 1996-99. not sure why this type never caught on. does anyone here know?
I have had 3 . my neighbor has one and loves it. i never had any problems with it other than a leaking axle seal.

PS Its nice to see more activity on the forums even for summer.
 

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not sure why this type never caught on. does anyone here know?
from the parts diagram it looks like they use a very odd and complex auger/drive setup which i am guessing didn't make them much money so they discontinued it. the standard belt setup most machines use are usually pretty cheap and reliable.
 

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sold a honda 622 today. strange beltless machine that i think was built in 1996-99. not sure why this type never caught on. does anyone here know?
What do they use for reduction? a 3:1 planetary, or perhaps a 2.2:1 internal clutch reverse box? The impeller speed has to be around 1000rpms so a 3600rpm engine needs reduction. Looks like a reverse rotation judging by the chute position. But then they'd need to use a vertically indexed (6 o'clock) gearbox...and then what about the rake rotation? The worm would have to be bottom load or reverse cut??? What happens when you hit wet news print and the shear pins fail? Belts not only provide torque transfer, but they are good at dampening shock loads.
 
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