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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
i haven't really been to a dealer to look at new blowers in a long time. i usually deal with older blowers from the 80's and early 90's.

i am just surprised on 2 things how much plastic is used and how thin the metal is that they use now for these things. i feel that they wont have the shelf life and will rust through faster then the thicker older snowblowers?

not to mention they are as expensive as ever. what do you guys think?
 

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Same with EVERYTHING ELSE made nowadays. Its all made to last a certain amount of time so you go back for more. Manufacturers dont want to sell a one and done, cant make money that way


-efisher-
 

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Not to familiar with the older blowers, but you're probably right in terms of materials used. It's like everything else now a days, look at cars for example, same thing has happened. Everyone wants a lighter blower full of power, and the only way to do that is to change materials.

But to be honest, who wants a blower to last a lifetime anyways?? I sure don't!! I loved buying a new Toro this year, and for $1000, I won't be upset if I only use it for 10 years, and buy a new one. I mean, if it doesn't eventually break down on you and fill with rust, what excuse are you gonna give your wife that you need another one...:wink::wink:
 

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Not exactly a shocker when you consider how everything else has changed...... tight economy and cost cutting is the name of the game if you wanna play. It's just the way it goes...... have you noticed how much shipping things has gone up!!? It's to a point where free shipping is a big deal now!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Not to familiar with the older blowers, but you're probably right in terms of materials used. It's like everything else now a days, look at cars for example, same thing has happened. Everyone wants a lighter blower full of power, and the only way to do that is to change materials.

But to be honest, who wants a blower to last a lifetime anyways?? I sure don't!! I loved buying a new Toro this year, and for $1000, I won't be upset if I only use it for 10 years, and buy a new one. I mean, if it doesn't eventually break down on you and fill with rust, what excuse are you gonna give your wife that you need another one...:wink::wink:
yea i suppose how you feel is probably the norm now. i am 32 but from talking to my dad and grandpa people used buy things that last pretty much a lifetime equipment . my grandpa has and still has a cub cadet riding lawn mower from 1969.

lately i have been coming across lots of 1970's ariens snow thro's (i buy and sell used blowers) still in good shape. i just find it hard to believe the new ones will last that long.
 

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A good quality snowblower from the ninetys cost how much.....Powershift Toro comes to mind..........more money then today's blowers so how could they keep the same quality? Lawn tractors the same thing.......early seventies a decent tractor cost about the same as a pickup truck.....imagine that today? Lawn tractor prices haven't gone up in forty years!.....but they are built like crap now.
 

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I am of the school to buy old and used ( low hours ) and keep it maintained forever. with the internet you can find parts. Better still is buy another one just for parts.

I still have things from 30-40 years ago that work fine with proper maintenance. Do the same thing with cars. Have some 70's cars still with over 300,000 miles on them. Registration and insurance fees are cheap. Parts are readily available and they are easy to work on.

My Dad gave me all his old tools before he passed that are 60 plus years old . BTW , they were all made in the good ol USA!!!
 

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Not to familiar with the older blowers, but you're probably right in terms of materials used. It's like everything else now a days, look at cars for example, same thing has happened. Everyone wants a lighter blower full of power, and the only way to do that is to change materials.

But to be honest, who wants a blower to last a lifetime anyways?? I sure don't!! I loved buying a new Toro this year, and for $1000, I won't be upset if I only use it for 10 years, and buy a new one. I mean, if it doesn't eventually break down on you and fill with rust, what excuse are you gonna give your wife that you need another one...:wink::wink:
Exactly. Just like old cars vs new. Old ones have thicker steel but rust out 10 times faster.. Thickness of steel has no bearing to the life of it
 

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I am a nostalgic kinda guy, especially the older I get. Additionally I realize that cost cutting is more apparent at this point in most machines relative to yesteryear. The Ariens Pro Series units feature heavier gauge auger housing side panels than their other models and you are paying extra for that as well as the other upgrades in the Pro Series. However the newer machines will generally outperform the older ones without requiring mods to throw far. If your newer machine is properly maintained and stored it can still last for decades.
 

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For snow blowers I tend to think the older ones get the jobdone effectively and last a mighty long time, so put me down on the older sideof the ledger on this one. In the future perhaps technology will change myopinion, for now however I like my old beast of a machine.

Some newer things I change my mind and go for the newertechnology. Cars are much more maintenance free and run like a clock, gone arethe days of sticking a comb down the carburetor butterfly on a blistering coldday, yearly rust coating to little avail, yearly tune-ups and rough rides.Technology has come a long way, so go modern on that one.

Light bulbs I go newer as well with LED light quality going up,cost dropping exponentially, lifespan lasting upwards to 25 years, and cost ofuse being 1/6th. Goodbye incandescentwith lifespans of 2 years, material costs in buying bulbs over 20 years addingup, electricity costs and killing the planet. Within a few years as prices falleven lower don’t know anyone who can argue incandesants are better overall. Iam buying LED’s with rebates for $2.00, which over the life in saving ofmaterial cost and electricity seems to be an easy choice.

In snow blowers however still on the side of the oldermodels, till some new features hit the market that is a game changer. We arenot there yet, so call me an old timer still…lol.
 

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Exactly. Just like old cars vs new. Old ones have thicker steel but rust out 10 times faster.. Thickness of steel has no bearing to the life of it
Thickness of Steel has a Great Bearing on the life of it. MTD, Cub Cadet, et al have Weak Tin Auger Buckets.that collapse at the bottom, and Rot Away. Here's a Comparison of a Typical Rotted MTD Bucket and an Early Ariens Bucket made of REAL Steel, not Tin. I don't see the Thick Ariens Bucket Rusting out 10x faster, and it's a 1962 vs a 1990s MTD.



 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thickness of Steel has a Great Bearing on the life of it. MTD, Cub Cadet, et al have Weak Tin Auger Buckets.that collapse at the bottom, and Rot Away. Here's a Comparison of a Typical Rotted MTD Bucket and an Early Ariens Bucket made of REAL Steel, not Tin. I don't see the Thick Ariens Bucket Rusting out 10x faster, and it's a 1962 vs a 1990s MTD.




im with you on that just didnt feel like starting a disagreement :coolpics:
 

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I'll take a heavy machine with thick steel any day. Good for getting under packed snow.

Sent from my XT1034 using Tapatalk
 

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We can all agree that they just done make anything like they used to, but with that said, there is nothing better then playing with a brand new shiny snowblower with all the latest bells and whistles. Grant it, I'm not that mechanically advanced, so I prefer something with warrantee, that hopefully won't need any work for a very long time. It even when I do have problems, I prefer taking it to my snowblower/lawnmower mechanic. I take my equipment in to see him pretty much annually, and for $40, he sharpens my blades, and makes sure everything is running smooth. I don't have time to fiddle with this stuff, and I expect it to work when I need it.
 

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Used to have an old Jacobsen. Everything that rotated had a ball bearing supporting it, cast iron gear box, and the bucket material was near a 1/8" thick. Built like a brick Sh** house compared to anything after it.

Had a newer 1977ish John Deere 826 that my dad bought new. It was a rattly old beast but never let me down. Bronze bushings on the things that rotated, cast iron gear box, and the housing material was slightly thinner. Sold that blower this summer.

Had a Honda HS1132 for a short time (hated it BTW). Thin material everywhere, aluminum gearbox, not sure on the bushings vs bearings. It was a good machine, but the tracks and hydro weren't for me.

I now have a Ariens 1336Pro. Material thickness is about what the John Deere had, cast iron gearbox, and plastic bushings here and there. And a ball bearing that they are very proud of ($$) supporting the impeller.
 

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Old machines have simplicity, strength, and durability on their side.

A quality (typically expensive) new machine has better ergonomics, greater throwing distance, and improved user functionality In an easier to manipulate package. Cheap junk aside.

The evolution of the snowblower is interesting to reflect on. A lot has changed and stayed the same.
 

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Like someone said earlier.. Who wants to use the same blower for 40 years anyway? Id rather buy a new one every decade. Now I do LOVE old classic blowers but to count on for heavy duty use and speed, id rather go with a new one . I sure do love the old restored machines no doubt.
 

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You really want to know what happened to them???? Where should I start first off they had to start making them more safety features. then the EPA got involved because all those tree hugging hippies thought those engines were leading to green house gases and depleteing the ozone. and now the steel that was once used here on the old school machines. is now being imported from globaly sourced vendors. the engines are now made oversees because of labor costs here. so anybody that does not know anything about the old dinosaurs that still roam the frozen tundras. is forced to go to some big box store every couple of years to get a new 1. for reasons of lack of maintance or just runs it into the ground. but that works in favor for manufactures which know that they will always have a product to sell to the unsuspecting masses. I don't know if it is cheaper to make machines then keeping a parts line going for the years that have gone before us. maybe it is because of the retooling of all the machines. I remember that Penske racing was going to buy up Saturn from GM. but they decided not to after finding out they would have to set up a parts replacement manufacturing line. which included those plastic door panels and all those other goofy parts they used. plus people feel the need for change every few years like a new car, house, or even a new improved spouse. AND THAT IS ALL THE MORE I AM SAYING ON THIS 1.:yahoo::yahoo::yahoo::yahoo::yahoo:
 

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You guys do realize that our kids, and grandkids will be looking at our current snowblowers and lawn mowers the same way in 20 years.
 
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