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Just out of curiosity, how long does a well-maintained machine usually last? Mine is almost 20 years old. Of course usage (commercial/residential) and snow amounts are a factor. But I am just wondering if the new machines of today will still be around in 20 years. Also, who has the oldest functioning machine on this blog and what type is it?
 

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What’s the life expectancy of a paper weight? Or a car? Too many variables to predict. Depends on brand/quality to start with, how it’s used or abused or NOT used (still needs to be maintained if not used) and maintained.
 

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Just out of curiosity, how long does a well-maintained machine usually last?
I have spent my entire life in the transportation and equipment field and it depends on the operator. Some guys are just hard on everything they use and it shows as breakdowns, early replacement and accidents.:wink2:
 

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10000 series Ariens are as thick as hair on a dog in my area....some look a little shopworn, and have patina but still are being used. I think some will be around still in another 40 or more years, or as long as they still make gasoline.
 

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I have spent my entire life in the transportation and equipment field and it depends on the operator. Some guys are just hard on everything they use and it shows as breakdowns, early replacement and accidents.:wink2:
Exactly. "divider rider", you're not one of those guys who moves dividers on highways, like the old Tappan Zee, are you?
 

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Just out of curiosity, how long does a well-maintained machine usually last? Mine is almost 20 years old. Of course usage (commercial/residential) and snow amounts are a factor. But I am just wondering if the new machines of today will still be around in 20 years. Also, who has the oldest functioning machine on this blog and what type is it?
No doubt you have heard about the man that smoked his pipe a very long time.


When a friend who hadn't seen him in years saw him again smoking the same pipe he asked if that was the same pipe.
" Yes "the man replied. "Its had three new stems and two new bowls but it's same old pipe".
 

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I heard thru the grapevine that the ones in Hawaii and Florida last a very long time.
Same used to be said about those on Vancouver Island and the Lower Mainland here in BC, but now they sometimes get more snow than the rest of the province.

That being said, maintenance and repair, I have several older machines I picked up this year, some older than a few members in this group (from the 70's) that needed carbs or belts.

My brother in law, on the other hand, is lucky to get 5 years out of a new machine. But he now is looking at retiring to Mexico for the winter, so that will change...
 

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I don't know, but I've had 3 machines that were near or over 20 years old. An MTD and 2 Ariens, and all 3 were/are still going. I'm pretty sure one of the Ariens was used commercially here in New England, maybe both were. All show evidence of their age, but all were still ready to keep working. So I don't think 20 years is unreasonable at all, for the machines that are that age now.

For the ones built today, as was said, maintenance will certainly play a part, as it always does. I'll admit to some concern over things that may be a little more finicky or complicated. Like joystick chute controls, auto-unlocking differentials, electric actuation of chutes, things like that.
 

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I got 20 years from my single stage Toro and as long as I can find the parts I need I think it'll keep going. There isn't much simpler than a 2 stroke single stage machine....
I agree on some of the fiddly gadgets of today. Not much need for em really.
 

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30 years is common . . . the fact that you can repower and repair mechanicals, as long as the frame and bucket does not rust out, the machines could be good for 50 years.

I have/had a couple of 30 year old machines. New engines, but otherwise mostly original parts.
 

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There are many variables to consider here: amount of use, the type of snow it's often used in, is the plow pile heavily salted, user technique, maintenance, initial build quality of the machine itself, catastrophic failure whether through lack of maintenance, poor build quality or rust can occur from about 2 years to over 50 years. Based on what we see on this forum Ariens, Toro & Honda machines show strong longevity. There are some members that own 4-5 decade old Ariens machines that are still getting the job done. That being said, past performance is no guarantee of future results.
 

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The common denominator

10000 series Ariens are as thick as hair on a dog in my area....some look a little shopworn, and have patina but still are being used. I think some will be around still in another 40 or more years, or as long as they still make gasoline.
Thats about it. Fuel. I can't imagine hitting an EOD with a battery machine.
Sid
 
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