Snowblower Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Received a hand me down non running snow blower from the father in law for free. Craftsman C950-52677-9 8/25. I have pretty much no experience working on small engines. I followed some donyboy videos and read some forum posts here. I now have a running machine! Just cleaned the carb, changed gas lines, and lubed the throttle/governor.

I realized there are bolts in the auger mechanism where shear bolts should be. The O.D. of the auger shaft is 1 1/4" and the bolt that was in there measured 1/4" in diameter. Can I just buy any shear pins that will fit those measurements? I live in Canada for those wondering.

Thanks,

Travis
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
Go to Canadian Tire or TSC and get the right length. The shaft the the auger rides its diameter and the diameter of the auger determines the length. The shear pin has two grooves that are thinner than the rest of the pin. You want these grooves lined up where the auger rides on the shaft. So if you hit something hard or frozen, the pine "Shears" there saving the gear box.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,313 Posts
Check the holes on the auger, if both sides are 1/4" part # 532005; if one hole is a 1/4" and the other side is larger part # 500026, 1501216, 8938, 9524. The one side is larger because it fits a bushing that comes with the shear pin.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,431 Posts
Since Sears Canada folded their tents about a year or so ago there is no parts support anymore.

I found shear bolts for a similar Craftsman blower at Canadian Tire, in MTD packaging. They had the aluminum collars that fit the larger hole in one side of the auger.

Grease the auger shafts through the grease nipples. You should grease the auger with the shear bolts removed, and after you get the grease in, rotate the augers to spread the grease around between the auger and the internal drive shafts. So not want to tighten the nuts on the shear bolts too much. They come with locking nuts that keep them from vibrating loose. You just want to snug them up so that the bolts can just be turned by hand. Grease the shear bolts before installing them. Check them every year before the season starts and replace any bent ones. They do get bent sometimes from smaller impacts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Check the holes on the auger, if both sides are 1/4" part # 532005; if one hole is a 1/4" and the other side is larger part # 500026, 1501216, 8938, 9524. The one side is larger because it fits a bushing that comes with the shear pin.
Yes the one side is larger than the other. Thanks so much for the part numbers!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Since Sears Canada folded their tents about a year or so ago there is no parts support anymore.

I found shear bolts for a similar Craftsman blower at Canadian Tire, in MTD packaging. They had the aluminum collars that fit the larger hole in one side of the auger.

Grease the auger shafts through the grease nipples. You should grease the auger with the shear bolts removed, and after you get the grease in, rotate the augers to spread the grease around between the auger and the internal drive shafts. So not want to tighten the nuts on the shear bolts too much. They come with locking nuts that keep them from vibrating loose. You just want to snug them up so that the bolts can just be turned by hand. Grease the shear bolts before installing them. Check them every year before the season starts and replace any bent ones. They do get bent sometimes from smaller impacts.
Thanks for all the information, I'll be heading to Canadian tire tomorrow to see what I can find. Also to get a grease gun. There's still so much to check over on this machine before winter comes!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Go to Canadian Tire or TSC and get the right length. The shaft the the auger rides its diameter and the diameter of the auger determines the length. The shear pin has two grooves that are thinner than the rest of the pin. You want these grooves lined up where the auger rides on the shaft. So if you hit something hard or frozen, the pine "Shears" there saving the gear box.
Thanks, I'll be heading out tomorrow to see what I can find. I live on a small city of 11,000 people so the selection is limited.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,803 Posts
Thanks, I'll be heading out tomorrow to see what I can find. I live on a small city of 11,000 people so the selection is limited.
well, the internet has everything. i hardly ever buy anything local. ebay , amz, google.......

ya , I know, shop local , and support local businesses. I would if their prices were competitive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
In electricity there are some strange rules about stress reciprocity, where an expensive component often fails, protecting the fuse. Same with things like shear bolts and pins, which are the mechanical equivalent of a fuse. I want to make darn sure that the shear bolt or pin fails well before a shaft/pulley/impeller or gearbox sees damaging strain. If there's a shear bolt that has the slightly smaller turned-down areas where it will shear, they are better than a straight bolt and would be my choice. Beyond the "extra" protection, even just a slightly smaller shear zones means that you can more easily change them in the field. The straight bolt will smear a little as it shears, and that often keeps the middle section from coming out cleanly following failure.

In my limited experience...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,313 Posts
You are looking at the right ones. These are the only ones with bushings. They are made from soft steel and will break at one of the "grooves" aka the threads, the threads are the grooves.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,892 Posts
That is sometimes the problem with advice. It's not always correct depending on the persons background. Most shear pins or bolts have the grooves to help them break where they should, but not all. The ones you're looking for will just be a soft bolt with a spacer.
You want to make sure that the auger will spin freely on the shaft before you bolt it together and remember to put some grease on the threads for the hole. Nothing worse than to break one in a few years and the center of the bolt is rusted into the shaft, driveways half way done and it's below zero. I used to check by jiggling the auger and if I could feel it loose on the shaft felt I was good. NOPE !! Broke a bolt last winter and found out the auger was loose on the shaft but the bolt was seized in the shaft. It's something to check each fall before you start the season. I have a couple machines that use that style and found out that it's a lot cheaper to get a pack of 6, 8 or even 10 off Amazon or Ebay rather than the local big box store. But, you're in Canada.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
One of the largest problems I have in Canada with using E-Bay and Amazon has been created by the "tariffs" placed on all imported goods. Add those costs to the shipping (which is always more to Canada) and my local supplier is much more economical most of the time, provided the parts are available.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,431 Posts
One of the largest problems I have in Canada with using E-Bay and Amazon has been created by the "tariffs" placed on all imported goods. Add those costs to the shipping (which is always more to Canada) and my local supplier is much more economical most of the time, provided the parts are available.
Always nice to be able to support the local supplier, if they are reasonably priced. We have many options these days to buy stuff, and that is a good thing I suppose.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top