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Discussion Starter #1
Back in August I acquired a Jacobsen Imperial 626. I had wanted to tinker with it before winter, but alas it never happened.

I did get to poke around with it a couple weeks ago. It's got compression but no spark. This, in and of itself, might not be a big deal. However, unlike with lawnmowers, my supply of snowblower parts is essentially nonexistent.

I'm on the fence about working on this because I'm not especially familiar Jacobsen and I don't know how difficult parts are to get (impossible for the lawn mower I have). It'd be one this if it were 100% complete, but it's missing the back cover, and some of the linkage seems to be seized, and its missing the shroud for the carburetor.

Would it be worth putting money into this, or would I be better off selling it to someone who has or needs Jacobsen spares to make it whole or use it for parts?

 

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i would sell it but as a whole, somebody will probably snag it up to do an engine swap, if the frames in good shape and the gearbox is good i usually wont consider a blower a parts unit, that would be one of my predator repower candidates, once you do a predator swap its worth 300 easy but if you want you can put 30 into fixing the points(parts arnt that much but your times worth something) and another 30 bucks to replace the carburetor, because if its been sitting long enough to have dirty points it probably been sitting long enough for the gas to go bad as well
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The thought had crossed my mind about doing a Predator swap. This thing looks like it would be quite a beast in the snow.

Do newer Tecumseh electronic ignition coils fit older engines like with Briggs? Just curious. I have thought about trying to get it running, as I'd like to see if the unit works before investing in a new engine for it.

What's parts availability like for these? Does Jacobsen support them at all?
 

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The thought had crossed my mind about doing a Predator swap. This thing looks like it would be quite a beast in the snow.

Do newer Tecumseh electronic ignition coils fit older engines like with Briggs? Just curious. I have thought about trying to get it running, as I'd like to see if the unit works before investing in a new engine for it.

What's parts availability like for these? Does Jacobsen support them at all?
Jacobsen is long gone now. parts are NLA on those
 

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i would sell it but as a whole, somebody will probably snag it up to do an engine swap, if the frames in good shape and the gearbox is good i usually wont consider a blower a parts unit, that would be one of my predator repower candidates, once you do a predator swap its worth 300 easy but if you want you can put 30 into fixing the points(parts arnt that much but your times worth something) and another 30 bucks to replace the carburetor, because if its been sitting long enough to have dirty points it probably been sitting long enough for the gas to go bad as well


As to dumping money into fixing that old Tecumseh I wouldn't. Like others have said putting a $99 Predator 212cc on it would be a much better bang for your buck then dumping money into trying to fix an old obselete L- head engine. Repowering with a modern great running Predator 212cc engine makes sense if the drive and auger gear box are in decent shape would mean you would have a $250 to $300 snowblower once you are done. I repowered a 1973 Gilson made Montgomery Ward 8/26 with a Predator 212cc engine and it runs great and throws snow 30 feet.
 

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As to dumping money into fixing that old Tecumseh I wouldn't. Like others have said putting a $99 Predator 212cc on it would be a much better bang for your buck then dumping money into trying to fix an old obselete L- head engine. Repowering with a modern great running Predator 212cc engine makes sense if the drive and auger gear box are in decent shape would mean you would have a $250 to $300 snowblower once you are done. I repowered a 1973 Gilson made Montgomery Ward 8/26 with a Predator 212cc engine and it runs great and throws snow 30 feet.
Well..it totally depends on your mindset and what you want out of the machine..
Some vintage snowblowers are starting to get into a similar category as classic cars..

Some people might look at this:



and say: "why waste your money fixing up that obsolete outdated thing? when for LESS money you could buy this:



brand new and cheap from China?! with all the "latest technology"!"

ummm..yeah. that is sort-of technically true, but perhaps SO not the point! ;)

Of course, if you just want something cheap that works (sort-of, for a short time) then sure, putting on the $99 Predator is an option.
For many who just want a cheap snowblower, thats an option.

For others, putting a $99 Predator on a classic vintage US-made snowblower is like putting a new Kia engine in a 1969 Camaro..
totally depends on what you are looking for.

Scot
 

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You can drop it off at my house, I can all ways use another blower
 

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Here's my take on this:

What you have there is a Tecumseh engine sitting on a Jacobsen snowblower.

If the snowblower proper has issues that require parts you can't get (meaning probably anything more specialized than a belt or tires) and can't fabricate, the decision is probably made for you - the machine is unrepairable.

If the machine itself is good or can easily be made that way and the *engine* is the issue, you're in much better shape. You can do a Predator swap as other posters have mentioned. You can fix the engine that's on it... Tecumseh parts are generally quite easy to find, sometimes OE, sometimes Chinese knockoffs. Or, you can find another compatible Tec engine on C-list or something and bolt it on there.

Re the ignition, based on my limited experience, you can't swap points for electronic ignition on those engines. The point ignition magnetos are under the flywheel with the magnets on the inside of the flywheel. The electronic ones are mounted outside the FW (as on Briggs engines) with the magnets on the outside of the FW also. So at absolute best you'd have to swap the flywheel, but I suspect the worse issue would be that the necessary mounting bosses for the magneto aren't present on the older engine.
 

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I agree Tecumseh stuff is a dime a dozen..... fixing them is no big deal...... and I see lots of Jacobsen blowers for sale all the time. No shortage of parts machines either.....
 

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I've just put a little time into rebuilding two Jacobsens, I really like how they are put together and their quality. I don't see much except the auger gearboxes that would be hard to repair or fabricate a part for, and the two I have were well used, but no issues with the transmissions at all or the axle bearings. I chose to get the Tecumsehs running, but a 212 Predator would only need a 3/4 to 1 inch bushing to adapt it to the Jake. If we ever get snow in Massachusetts again, I'll have personal knowledge on how well they throw snow. BTW no rust on these old girls at all....only thing worn on them were the skid plates.......
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Latest forecast says we're about to get 8-12 inches in my area of MA.

Did you need to free up the linkages on the ones you worked on?
 

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where in Mass are you located? I'm on the south coast...we never get snow....LOL. I sprayed some PB blast on the older Jake and got the friction wheel moving up and down good with a crowbar. Then used lithium grease on all moving parts..all good now. The newer one...like yours, wasn't grabbing good and slipping some....I was able to see that the arm that gave tension to the friction disc, was bent just slightly, and restricted in its travel by hitting the handlebar. One wack with a hammer and all fixed. These Jakes are the first I've seen and worked on, and I really like them from a machinery and quality standpoint. The ones I've seen working on Youtube seem to throw well. I'm going to do my first impeller mod on one or both of these for practice....probably just one so I can see the difference between them before and after. My problem is after working on a machine for a while, I get attached to it. I've got to be strong and sell a few.
 

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Here's an option (assuming the coil is good) Link: Universal Electronic Ignition I used something like this a long time ago and worked fine. It basically replaces the points and all it does is fire the coil when the magnet induces a charge into the primary circuit.


Seems Stens reproduces Tecumseh coils. But a Predator swap seems fun. A used Tecumseh OHV Snow King (OHSK model) is another option but likely will cost more than the Pred. but are relatively modern . A local mower shop has a couple, one's a runner and the other needs something fixed but these were used in a bunch of brands so should be available. The local shops have all kinds of snow throwers sitting around for parts so could be worth a shot.


But, like others I'd prefer to see it fixed up then parted out since there's a lot of that on Ebay.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
where in Mass are you located? I'm on the south coast...we never get snow....LOL. I sprayed some PB blast on the older Jake and got the friction wheel moving up and down good with a crowbar. Then used lithium grease on all moving parts..all good now. The newer one...like yours, wasn't grabbing good and slipping some....I was able to see that the arm that gave tension to the friction disc, was bent just slightly, and restricted in its travel by hitting the handlebar. One wack with a hammer and all fixed. These Jakes are the first I've seen and worked on, and I really like them from a machinery and quality standpoint. The ones I've seen working on Youtube seem to throw well. I'm going to do my first impeller mod on one or both of these for practice....probably just one so I can see the difference between them before and after. My problem is after working on a machine for a while, I get attached to it. I've got to be strong and sell a few.
Outer Route 2 in Northern Worcester County. We're forecast to get 8-12.

When the weather gets better I'll play with it, thanks for the tips!

Here's an option (assuming the coil is good) Link: Universal Electronic Ignition I used something like this a long time ago and worked fine. It basically replaces the points and all it does is fire the coil when the magnet induces a charge into the primary circuit.


Seems Stens reproduces Tecumseh coils. But a Predator swap seems fun. A used Tecumseh OHV Snow King (OHSK model) is another option but likely will cost more than the Pred. but are relatively modern . A local mower shop has a couple, one's a runner and the other needs something fixed but these were used in a bunch of brands so should be available. The local shops have all kinds of snow throwers sitting around for parts so could be worth a shot.


But, like others I'd prefer to see it fixed up then parted out since there's a lot of that on Ebay.
I didn't know those even existed! For $11 on Amazon its worth a try. Even if I don't keep teh original engine, I'd like to try to get it running so I can see how the rest of the machine works...then we can talk engine swaps. :)
 

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Outer Route 2 in Northern Worcester County. We're forecast to get 8-12.

When the weather gets better I'll play with it, thanks for the tips!



I didn't know those even existed! For $11 on Amazon its worth a try. Even if I don't keep teh original engine, I'd like to try to get it running so I can see how the rest of the machine works...then we can talk engine swaps. :)


It up to you on how you proceed. Being that the snow blower has a non-running engine with no spark it's possible it could be as simple as coil replacement and it's fixed or it could be just the tip of the iceberg as to what’s not working on that engine. I tend to say if you have a good running engine keep it that way with preventative maintenance. Being that this engine is not running and has no-spark you could opt for the ebay electronic ignition and hope that the rest of the engine is in decent mechanical shape. At $11 dollars it's not too expensive. However if a carburetor cleaning and new ignition and spark plug doesn't get it to pop I would not spend big money trying to resurrect this old engine. I have 2 lawn mowers one is at my cabin and the other is at my house. Both of them have the original Briggs and Stratton vertical shaft L-head engines and the oldest one is about 12 years old. Both engines continue to run well so I will keep them however if they should become unreliable or fail to work well enough to cut the grass I will either swap the engine with a vertical shaft OHV Predator engine or simply buy another lawnmower. I have done small engine maintenance for a lawn cutting service when I was a college student and if the engine has a damaged cylinder bore (low compression) and worn valve guides it really is no longer cost effective to attempt to repair this. Plus most of these old Tecumseh engines had what is called a cool bore (cylinder bored into cast aluminum head) meaning there is no caste iron cylinder liner so often they are un-repairable if the bore is damaged. As to this Jacobsen Snow blower being a collectable it is only worth what someone will pay you for it and if it doesn't run it is worth $50 at most. Comparing a snowblower to a vintage collectable car makes me chuckle since a snowblower is only worth what someone will pay for it and if the engine doesn't run it worth $50 at most.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
It up to you on how you proceed. Being that the snow blower has a non-running engine with no spark it's possible it could be as simple as coil replacement and it's fixed or it could be just the tip of the iceberg as to what’s not working on that engine. I tend to say if you have a good running engine keep it that way with preventative maintenance. Being that this engine is not running and has no-spark you could opt for the ebay electronic ignition and hope that the rest of the engine is in decent mechanical shape. At $11 dollars it's not too expensive. However if a carburetor cleaning and new ignition and spark plug doesn't get it to pop I would not spend big money trying to resurrect this old engine. I have 2 lawn mowers one is at my cabin and the other is at my house. Both of them have the original Briggs and Stratton vertical shaft L-head engines and the oldest one is about 12 years old. Both engines continue to run well so I will keep them however if they should become unreliable or fail to work well enough to cut the grass I will either swap the engine with a vertical shaft OHV Predator engine or simply buy another lawnmower. I have done small engine maintenance for a lawn cutting service when I was a college student and if the engine has a damaged cylinder bore (low compression) and worn valve guides it really is no longer cost effective to attempt to repair this. Plus most of these old Tecumseh engines had what is called a cool bore (cylinder bored into cast aluminum head) meaning there is no caste iron cylinder liner so often they are un-repairable if the bore is damaged. As to this Jacobsen Snow blower being a collectable it is only worth what someone will pay you for it and if it doesn't run it is worth $50 at most. Comparing a snowblower to a vintage collectable car makes me chuckle since a snowblower is only worth what someone will pay for it and if the engine doesn't run it worth $50 at most.
I agree, if it doesn't fire after getting spark and cleaning the carburetor I'm not going to waste my time.

I'm not really interested in the collectability of it, I just like how well built older ones are. Besides, I already have my keeper. :)

 

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That is a really nice Older Simplicity Blower!. I like to take care of my stuff and rather than go out and get a new snow blower I repowered it. I waited many years messing around instead of blowing snow just to get that old 5hp Tecumseh to run right and I stumbled across on how good the Predator 212cc engines are when I repowered a Doodle bug minibike with one. It sounds like you paid very little or got that Old Jacobsen for free? Three years ago I bought an old Gilson made Montgomery Ward Unitrol 3speed blower with a Briggs 8hp on it for $15. I tore it down and fixed it all up and I tried to get the original engine to run well but it had some mechanical issues so I eventually repowered it. I use it at my cabin to blow snow. I will always attempt to tune up or get an old engine running well but I will not settle for an unreliable or poor running just to have an original engine on it. I have some of the nicest old stuff like my 1996 Polaris XLT touring that is very clean and I done many improvements to it as well such as a set of Thunderdome Performance Billet heads and re-clutched it with and SLP Black ice anodized helix with a Silver/blue secondary spring and SLP super slippery clutch buttons. I also replaced the original track with a 1-inch lug full paddle designed track off a Polaris SKS with the 133.5 inch track as well as a set of Simmons flexi skis. Lets just say it takes off a whole lot better than it did in stock form and it is a much better snow machine now than it was with the touring track. Don't feel pressured by others into doing what you don't think will work and do what it takes to get it running well with or without the original engine on it.
 
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