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Discussion Starter #1
This is somewhat off-topic, but I have used this ECHO back pack blower to remove snow. :grin: It's a PB500H, 50cc engine. It's probably 7 yrs old. Runs perfect.

Question: the owner's manual shows a maintenance routine recommended every 3 months. They suggest the 'Cylinder Exhaust Port should be inspected or cleaned' (decarbon-ed?). This OPE runs great, I've never had an issue with it of any kind. Performs as I'd expect it to. I use the prescribed octane gasoline and their 2 stroke oil. Is this busy work or something I should actually look into doing? Thanks.


- - still hoping for some snow this season.
 

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I have the 770T, and I have used it before on a light snow event, worked great, … but to be honest, most of those events are melted her in CT in pretty short order with just a little surface showing.

Being a homeowner, I would suspect you are just fine, as I am. I would imagine if we were landscapers, using it 8 hours a day, week in and week out, year round, it might need some checking.
 

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I have a Stihl 2 stroke blower/vacuum for picking up leaves. The exhaust has a metal cylindrical screen (spark arrestor) screwed into it. The recommendation is to clean the screen with a propane torch every year, or when the machine loses most of its power, whichever comes first. Same thing on a Stihl 2 cycle weed eater, but the screen has to be removed from the muffler. Using premium non ethanol gas with a bottle of Stihl oil in 5 liters of gas.

The propane torch quickly burns off the crud that blocks the screen. If there is no problem in 7 years then likely the spark arrestor has been removed.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
No, nobody has ever done any work on the engine apart from a spark plug replacement and a new air filter a couple days ago.

I do see a separate procedure to clean/check the spark arrestor. Maybe I'll look at this stuff over Xmas holiday but it says gaskets need to be replaced if this stuff is taken apart and I'd have to order those pieces.
 

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I got a stihl 026 when I was about 12 and used it until I was around 20. Grew up logging so it wasn't a big deal to me, but it got used 5 days a week every week of summer "vacation" and once I graduated it was 52 weeks a year until I went off an joined the military. Anyway I still have it and it didn't want to run worth a poo so I tore into it. Just a little carbon soot on the exhaust side from burning 2cycle mix but otherwise nothing bad. I ended up getting a larger jug and piston and a new carb too but the main culprit was crank seals that deteriorated from use and from sitting for nearly 2 decades. Well it did run fine when I last used it but back then I didn't know about sta-bil or anything like long term storage stuff so it pretty much sat with old gas in it for a long long time.


That saw got a LOT of use and every time it was fired up it would run for a five to twenty minutes at a time. I imagine a blower is always under a full load so as long as it gets nice and toasty hot then it should keep itself fairly clean as long as you're using good oil and gas mix. If you're concerned you can pull the muffler off and look into the exhaust port, might be able to clean it through there with a small brass brush or such or just some good carb cleaner. Use safety glasses so you don't end up with schmutz in your eyes (trust me) as it doesn't feel that good!
 

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I would not worry about it. I have checked all of my 2 stroke engines, string trimmers and snow blowers, and none had much if any buildup. They just don't get used enough. You can check the port out if you want out of curiosity, but I suspect you will be fine for years.
 

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may not hurt to give it a good dose of seafoam, then a bit in every tank for maintenance.
 
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No, nobody has ever done any work on the engine apart from a spark plug replacement and a new air filter a couple days ago.

I do see a separate procedure to clean/check the spark arrestor. Maybe I'll look at this stuff over Xmas holiday but it says gaskets need to be replaced if this stuff is taken apart and I'd have to order those pieces.
If it revs up like it's supposed to its fine.
Usually what's causes the clogging is using to much oil followed by loafing around..A blower has a load when you pull the trigger and they don't idle around much..it's fine
Are you sure the screen isn't at the tip of the exhaust...you usually have to take off the exhaust to see the exhaust port..but the spark arrestor is often located at the tip of the muffler



Sent from my LM-Q710.FG using Tapatalk
 

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De-carbonizing was a normal maintenance thing for two stroke engines. With today's better oils, it isn't required as much as in the past. Today's better oils have a much lower "Ash Content" and burn much cleaner.
Most times you want to check the spark arrestor screen to make sure it doesn't get clogged, and periodically remove the muffler to check the exhaust port for carbon build-up, then while you have it off and checking the port, visually inspect your piston skirt and inner cylinder walls for any damage.
 

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Agree with ST1100A in the past.

I use to have a tree lawn landscape business and never cleaned the exhaust port or screen. If the muffler came off for any reason, loose screws, replacement, then I removed the spark arrestor screen. That screen is meant to reduce the chance of fire in the woods with leaf debri layer on the floor of the forest.

Use synthetic 2 cycle oil, that will reduce carbon build up.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
OK, I had this apart today and things looked like new. The spark arrestor screen was completely clean as were the other pieces I could view - - no oily residue anywhere. A few flakes of stuff, but nothing to have bothered with. The gasket fell apart so I'll have to get another. Put a new plug in. Old plug was showing its age.
 
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