Snowblower Forum banner

1 - 20 of 66 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
579 Posts
Who loves the old ones! I got this one from the original owner. It just needed to be put back together. I'm probably gonna hang onto it considering the condition it's in. I did put newer tires on it because the old ones were dry rotted pretty badly.
You'll be glad you put those X-Trac tires on!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,717 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,320 Posts
oneacer - I like that Yardman. How does the extension of the auger beyond the housing sides work on a HARD left overnight EOD? I'm wondering if this is the key to make it easier.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,521 Posts
i gave my aunt a snowblower similar to that. same 12" impeller and rectangle shoot output. i found while it beat shoveling it really seemed like the rectangle shoot was holding it back. i definitely like the craftsman style machines and the way the handles are.

most of the stuff i run is on the newer side other than the 5/23 craftsman that i use over at my sisters place. definitely not as thick and heavy as some of the machines i have dealt with over the years. i do like the quality of old machine but do kind of like how the new stuff maneuvers and how much lighter they are. my yardworks and ariens are the 2 i think i will likely keep around for a bit. haven't really found a machine i like enough to replace them yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,717 Posts
@JL,

Yes, that Yardman 7100 was purchased by my father new way back around 69-70 … 26" bucket.

That is my go to machine for the heavy snow. I have never, ever had an issue with EOD, and yes, it chews through the hard pack without skipping a beat. And because of the chain driven drum, along with the cable driven chute rotation, as you crank the chute, it rotates the chute drum base from side to side, as well as spinning the chute around. That, along with the chute design, allows it to throw the farthest of any machine I have. You also have a spring loaded lever to manually rotate the chute in any direction as well.

The only thing with this machine, because of its force and the lack of safety features, you have to be very diligent in its operation. I have operated it all my life, and its operation is as natural to me as breathing.

Just a footnote. .. Another thing I love about that machine, is that it is a chain driven auger, as you can see from the side … The impeller shaft is a stub shaft, and no auger gear box to deal with. Just this past summer, I replaced the SnowHog tires, as I wore them out, and put on new X-Trac. I also pulled off the side auger chain cover for inspection and lube, and it looks like it did when it was new, including the chain idler.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts


Remarkable! I’m sure it’s very rewarding to restore these and take good care of them while they treat you well in return.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Who loves the old ones! I got this one from the original owner. It just needed to be put back together. I'm probably gonna hang onto it considering the condition it's in. I did put newer tires on it because the old ones were dry rotted pretty badly.
Looks alot like my NOMA but I'm a 1028 circa '95.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,080 Posts
How old is 'older' ? I like the ones from about 1984 (when a fair amount of the safety features where added) to about 2000 . . . before too many plastics were added.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
I like my old craftsman. The only thing I dont like Is that my clothes smells more gas with this one then the newer ariens that I have. Gave it a bit of tlc over the summer. Some new bearings and friction disk and a few coats of paint o the bucket. Should be good for another few years. Havent used it yet. All the snow is melting right now up here in Quebec.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Running a 1978 Bob-Cat 5 HP-20", built by the now long-gone Wisconsin Marine Co., Lake Mills, WI, not the current Bobcat. Will be picking her up 1/9 from the local trade school where they rebuilt the B & S engine, etc.

Question: What guidelines do you suggest for adjusting the skids for a concrete driveway?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,673 Posts
I have to admit I like the older (mid 70's) Murray built Craftsman blowers. The Tecumseh transmission is a beast and 'almost' impossible to break in normal usage. In fact I built the machine I wanted from multiple Craftsman's, affectionately known as the Searsasaurus.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,717 Posts
@marspatt,

Myself, … On a level surface, I place the bottom edge of the cutting edge bar, which is attached to the bottom of the bucket, onto a wooden yardstick, or you could use a paint stirrer, or something similar.

Then, loosen the side skids, drop them flush, resting on the ground, and tighten them. Personally , I have switched all mine over to the Poly Roller Skids.

Never let the cutting edge, or the augers lay directly rubbing on the ground, unless you want to be prematurely wearing them out and replacing them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,717 Posts
@Xilbus,

Nice refurbish, and good looking machines.

Nice to see people maintaining there machines for many future years of operation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
Running a 1978 Bob-Cat 5 HP-20", built by the now long-gone Wisconsin Marine Co., Lake Mills, WI, not the current Bobcat. Will be picking her up 1/9 from the local trade school where they rebuilt the B & S engine, etc.

Question: What guidelines do you suggest for adjusting the skids for a concrete driveway?

@marspatt,

Myself, … On a level surface, I place the bottom edge of the cutting edge bar, which is attached to the bottom of the bucket, onto a wooden yardstick, or you could use a paint stirrer, or something similar.

Then, loosen the side skids, drop them flush, resting on the ground, and tighten them. Personally , I have switched all mine over to the Poly Roller Skids.

Never let the cutting edge, or the augers lay directly rubbing on the ground, unless you want to be prematurely wearing them out and replacing them.

I do that but with a washer or maybe a quarter under the scraper bar. All depends on how clean you want it and how flat/level the concrete is, more gap for a more imperfect surface.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
405 Posts
Pushing against the grain, I have zero desire to own an old snowblower. I find them pretty much in the same category as and old car vs a new car. And sure, I understand the basics are very much the same but beyond basics new for me anyway means reliability.

I nursed my old Bolens 1030 for decades! Enough is enough. Nothing like trying to repair an old POS only to find parts are just not available.
 
1 - 20 of 66 Posts
Top