Snowblower Forum banner

21 - 32 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,418 Posts
I made up a long list of things to check when
a snow blower is not working if you want to go
back through my posts.

The major thing is if the roof avalanche snow
sets overnight the freeze thaw cycle will be the
(&^%$%^& (cow manure) you cant even
shovel anyway.

Living with a metal roof for 42 years teaches
you a lot.

I would at least check the V belts and if the
rubber comes off in your hands when you
grip the V belt they should be replaced.

The other thing is you should buy a few cans
of fluid film aerosol spray to coat the chute,
spout, impeller, impeller housing and cross augers
several times and let it dry between coats and
it will help with clearing the snowpack.


Leon
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
374 Posts
170433
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
Definitely not the machine. Any snow that comes off the roof needs to be removed asap. Slide off or shovel off, It's hard enough to move when it's fresh. The next day, you'll be out there using a gravel shovel and cussing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,027 Posts
@IDEngineer the steel roofed houses that I clear (2) have decorative raised pieces in a couple of rows across the roof to prevent large amounts of snow falling on the driveway at one time. One house had the decorative pieces installed with the roof and the other after a year or two dealing with your problem (before my time blowing that driveway). Sounds like that approach may resolve your problem too.
 

·
Registered
Eastern Ontario, Canada
Joined
·
33 Posts
I've had this problem with two snowblowers now. My previous 30 inch ~10 HP MTD unit which I owned since new for 25+ years could throw freshly fallen snow like a firehose. Even heavy, wet stuff. But when I'd run it into piled snow (like the piles that result from snow sliding off a roof) it would just stall in place, eat a hole in the snow in the shape of the augers, and not move forward.
I've read reports of people comfortably using these machines to blow away the ice berms caused by snowplows at the ends of their driveways, but there is ZERO chance either of my two machines would make any headway. An ice berm is way denser than the stuff I already can't move, and the only way I get rid of the "roof snow" now is to first break it up with a shovel so the machine can get into it.
In the following videos, roof snow is purposely pulled down, and then the pile blown some time later, and, when dealing with a really large snow plow berm, there's instances of rocking the blower and using a shovel. That's with a Platinum 24 EFI. It's the same as the Platinum 24 but fuel injected with electronic governor which might provide more consistent engine speed, but I doubt affects how the front end moves into a large pile. (Note, the two videos are separate instances of heavy snowfall.)

Just thought this might provide something to compare with the situations you have.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
374 Posts
The OP stated :

But when I'd run it into piled snow (like the piles that result from snow sliding off a roof) it would just stall in place, eat a hole in the snow in the shape of the augers, and not move forward.

And:

It's not a traction problem. Yes, the tires spin but even with that I have to give it literally everything I have to get any forward movement.



It sounds like the augers are rotating correctly and the fan is tossing what the auger moves into the center. It also sounds like his blower transmission is applying enough torque to drive the wheel even when the machine is stalled. He comes to a point where something is prohibiting his forward progress.

SO what's left? Either his bucket, skids or scraper is caught on something every time he attempts to cut into a snowbank OR the snow he is attempting to move is too dense for the bucket to cut. I vote the second possibility. The volume of the snow and velocity
 
  • Like
Reactions: PlOM

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
367 Posts
We have the snow/ice guards on our metal roof in areas were sliding snow or ice could injure someone or damage vehicles etc.

I will usually pull snow off the roof once or twice a winter because of snow load. I try to do this before a forecast of above freezing temperatures or rain and make sure I try to blow the snow the same day. I have no issues with the Ariens blowing this compacted snow, however it is important to go at it at your slowest speed and you shouldn't have to struggle with the machine. It also helps if you take half width buckets.

The snow I pull down onto my second story decks I do have to take small bites with my little 18" electric blower and at times ram it into the 2 or 3 foot high pile. I also will have to break up large chunks with a shovel.

If the snow has time to settle, especially if it has a thaw- freeze cycle I think any machine (short of a Gravely Snow Cannon) will struggle with the concrete like pile.
 

·
Registered
Eastern Ontario, Canada
Joined
·
33 Posts
I will usually pull snow off the roof once or twice a winter because of snow load . . .
In the second video I linked above, beginning at 8:35, the roof snow is pulled down and then the blower is used. It still required using a shovel to break up because, as was mentioned in the video, the pulled-down snow landed on an already deep snow, and the whole thing was compressed down. I doubt the Ariens in the video was faulty in any way. There could be some conditions where timing isn't a factor; the bucket frame can't penetrate the pile.

In some cases, until a first pass is made, a half-width pass isn't possible. In my experience, it's when making that first pass through a packed plow berm that the stalling is more apparent.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
312 Posts
If you place the skid shoes behind the bucket, make the nose of the auger gear box sharp, make the scraper bar sharp, and find ways to get more traction, I think they will help. Otherwise, you will have to take it easy. Everything have a limitation. You under-estimated packed snow there. Even snow plow trucks try to avoid packed snow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,769 Posts
Even snow plow trucks try to avoid packed snow.
A few years back I saw a small truck plowing snow out of a side street and making a big pile on the opposite side of the main street; looked like he couldn't push it any farther. About a half hour later another truck came down the main street, and when it hit that pile the whole rig jumped sideways a foot or so. Impressed me with how much that dense pile affected the big truck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Not sure if I missed it but if the blower does not have the pushing power to get in to the snow does it have chains on it? I don't have the problem the OP is dealing with as the wind here and the positioning of the house pretty much keeps the snow off the roof.
 
21 - 32 of 32 Posts
Top