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I just bought a 2015 Troy bilt storm 2060 (HD ran out of the ariens compact model). It says to use 5w-30, so I went to auto zone and only found oils that seem to be designed for cars. I ended up buying a quart of Castol SAE 5W-30.

My question is is this okay to use? Or should I have gotten a 5W-30 designed for snow blowers (if such a thing exists).

Also, the salesman at lowes told me the snow blower comes with about 5 hours worth of oil in it, so I used it a little today (I checked the dipstick to make sure). When I do add oil to it, can I just top it off and mix oils? Or do I need to drain it first and maybe clean something?
 

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I make it practice to check oil with every tank of fuel. I suggest doing the same at least until you understand the usage pattern.

There is really no such ting as snowblower oil, what you got should be fine if meets the engine requirements. FWIW I'm partial to synthetic 5-30 but there are threads that beat that to death.

You will top it off as needed and change it periodically, generally once per year. Keep it at the full line, don't take liberties in the OK range. By staying at the full line you have some safety margin if consumption spikes and a little more mass to process heat with.

Pete
 

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You will be just fine with the oil you got. But I would recommend you eventually get over to Mobil-1 5W30 Full synthetic. The synthetics do a better job at heat dissipation and also will lube the engine quicker when cold. So run what you have now for a few hours, get maybe 5-8 hours on her, then change it out. You'll be just fine.
 

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I just bought a 2015 Troy bilt storm 2060

Also, the salesman at lowes told me the snow blower comes with about 5 hours worth of oil in it, so I used it a little today (I checked the dipstick to make sure). When I do add oil to it, can I just top it off and mix oils? Or do I need to drain it first and maybe clean something?
The 5 hours worth of oil was because it's a new machine. Brand new engines have to wear in, and they make a lot of contaminants doing so. You will want to drain out all the oil after a few hours of use and put in fresh stuff. We call it break-in oil. After the first oil change you can go much longer. Most do it (change it) once a year.
 

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I agree with GoBlowSnow, you want to be using the full synthetic 5w30 oil, as recommended by B&S and others. I use no particular brand and get it in a 5 quart size at WalMart. It offers better operating range and protection. I would also change it after a few hours of operation being that it is new, getting rid of the "break in" oil.

I have 3 blowers and moved them all over to the full synthetic 5w30.
 

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It's probably overkill, but I change my oil twice a year. Once roughly halfway through the snow season, and then once after the season is over. It's currently one of the few things I feel I can do, haha, so I figure it can't hurt and the oil is cheap enough.
Have been using Quaker State Advanced Durability 5W-30 as of late, haven't made the jump to synthetic yet.
 

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The quart of Castrol 5W-30 you bought is just fine. Go ahead and use it. I would recommend, however, that after your first 2-3+ hours of use, you change the oil to get rid of all the break-in bits and pieces floating around in your motor oil. They aren't doing your motor any good.

Synthetic is good in a snowblower if it is started in an unheated space because it flows more easily in frigid temps. If the machine is stored in a heated garage, synthetic is not needed.

Seasonal oil changes are recommended because there is no air filter, there is no oil filter to catch bits of metal and fuel dilution is common in these engines. 3 reasons NOT to stretch your oil change interval (OCI) and another reason synthetic is not needed and is usually just a waste of money.

Oil changes in a snowblower are as easy as easy gets. Most current models have a spout off the back of the machine to make it as simple as can-be.

Mixing oil weights, brands or types of oils is OK. They are all compatible. You are not likely to get better protection by blending, but it will do no harm. Want a lil' extra protection for your motor? Add a touch of break-in additive (many brands to choose from) or this stuff:

LIQUI MOLY - Motor Oils, Additives, Car Care - Products - MoS2 Anti-Friction Engine Treatment

Do NOT over-treat. Too much additive can mess with the original chemistry of the oil and protection begins to go down the more you add.

I use "Yeti Blood," an HDEO 0W30 but it is overkill:

http://i229.photobucket.com/albums/ee149/BrorJace/Oil%20Analysis/Chevron_Delo_0W-30_large.jpg
 

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Look at your owners manual and follow "Their" initial "Break In" Hour recommendations. If there was a major concern about the residual "Machining Dust" from manufacturing the OEM would have performed a pre-delivery oil change or attached an Oil Filter on the motor. Use a Synthetic Oil of your choice since the operating temperature will be reached when in use. Synthetics move heat which is the primary reason(not the only reason) for component failure and is recommended by all OEM equipment. I would highly recommend you Do Not use additives in your oil because if your oil is of any quality it would be performing they way it should and be recommended by the OEM. Im sure in your manual as with any equipment it does not recommend you use an oil additive. If you have any further questions let me know. Thanks!
 

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I just bought a 2015 Troy bilt storm 2060 (HD ran out of the ariens compact model). It says to use 5w-30, so I went to auto zone and only found oils that seem to be designed for cars. I ended up buying a quart of Castol SAE 5W-30.

My question is is this okay to use? Or should I have gotten a 5W-30 designed for snow blowers (if such a thing exists).

Also, the salesman at lowes told me the snow blower comes with about 5 hours worth of oil in it, so I used it a little today (I checked the dipstick to make sure). When I do add oil to it, can I just top it off and mix oils? Or do I need to drain it first and maybe clean something?
The oil required is Automotive detergent oil conforming to API service category SJ or newer (currently SN). You will see the API insignia in a prominent position on the container. There are other categories of oil for different needs such as non-detergent, diesel, etc that would likely be for sale at Auto Zone. Check your container specifies the oil meets the above specification.

The salesman is mistaken in the idea that your machine came with about 5 hours worth of oil in it, as others have said. Your engine should not use any oil, or a very nominal amount. The idea is that after a period of first use the engine oil needs to be changed to eliminate contaminants. The change interval varies greatly by manufacturer and user. Your owner manual will suggest a time period for the first oil change, mine is the first month of use (about 20 hours in my case). Then there will be a recommendation to change the oil on a seasonal or usage basis.

Good luck.
 

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Yeah I use thrb5 qt jug of super tech 5w30 full synthetic from walmart great price and I run that in all my power equipment except for my old Troy bilt horse!!!!
 

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any 5w-30 oil is fine.. synthetics will help get the engine started in cold temps.. not very noticeable if you us an electric start.. but if you pull start it dead cold on a COLD day.. youll get a workout... synthetics will help then.. myself ive used 0w-30 sythetic oil and the difference is amazing in cold days... plus as others mentionned, synthetics will help reduce cold start wear and a bunch other positives.. the only real negative is the price.. it IS more epensive than regular oils but hey. its only one quart right?;)
 

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I just bought a 2015 Troy bilt storm 2060 (HD ran out of the ariens compact model). It says to use 5w-30, so I went to auto zone and only found oils that seem to be designed for cars. I ended up buying a quart of Castol SAE 5W-30.

My question is is this okay to use? Or should I have gotten a 5W-30 designed for snow blowers (if such a thing exists).

Also, the salesman at lowes told me the snow blower comes with about 5 hours worth of oil in it, so I used it a little today (I checked the dipstick to make sure). When I do add oil to it, can I just top it off and mix oils? Or do I need to drain it first and maybe clean something?
Ok let's make it simple 5W-30 for car is what you need. Usually small engine need an oil change after 5h of run time when new check your manual. I check the oil level every time I use it.
Regular oil is adequate but synthetic is better
Yes if your oil level comes down you top it up but it shouldn't happen if you follow your manual maintenance schedule
 

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”Look at your owners manual and follow 'their' initial 'break-in" hour recommendations. If there was a major concern about the residual "Machining Dust" from manufacturing the OEM would have performed a pre-delivery oil change or attached an Oil Filter on the motor.”


The quality of owner's manuals varies greatly these days. I do recommend owners read them … but I consider them as 'guidebooks' rather than 'bibles.' However most do, in fact, recommend a quick initial oil change after about 5 hours of initial engine run-in. It's conventional wisdom that this is to flush out break-in particles that are so prevalent in a nearly-new motor (sorry, I can't cite a source). The oil that came out of my B&S on my Ariens was so full of metal, it looked like silver soup. Given the tiny sumps these engines have, best to flush this stuff out as soon as you can. I changed my oil 3 times in the first 12 hours.


Do you have any evidence to share with us that shows that high-heat is a cause for concern in engines operated in 0F to 40F degree weather? If so, I will agree that synthetic is a very good idea. Currently, I think they are unnecessary unless you need the cold-start performance.

”I would highly recommend you Do Not use additives in your oil because if your oil is of any quality it would be performing they way it should and be recommended by the OEM. I'm sure in your manual as with any equipment it does not recommend you use an oil additive. “


While not necessary, the addition of extra metallic additives can help protect engines that are pushed hard. I believe this is why they usually ask for an old SAE spec such as SJ or SL. Since there is essentially no emissions equipment on these motors, fouling sensors, etc … is not a concern. The reason manufacturers do not recommend oil additives in general is that they have no control over which ones are used. Best/easiest/simplest to recommend none be used at all.


PS: I like Amsoil and general, and use a few of their specialty products like MTF. This has nothing to do with brands and I try to recommend at least 2 or 3 different brands so people don't think I'm pushing my favorites.
 

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Ok let's make it simple 5W-30 for car is what you need. Usually small engine need an oil change after 5h of run time when new check your manual. I check the oil level every time I use it.
Regular oil is adequate but synthetic is better
Yes if your oil level comes down you top it up but it shouldn't happen if you follow your manual maintenance schedule
Yeah, keep it simple! While you're at it, get a dedicated 2 gallon plastic fuel can and a bottle of fuel stabilizer. I put the stabilizer in the fuel jug and run it in the machine all the time. That way you don't have to remember to put it in before summer storeage.
 

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My thinking is old-school I guess. The initial oil fill was barely at the 'low' mark so it got a splash to bring it to the top mark. After a couple hours of use, the level dropped to midway between the marks, and the oil was noticeably darker. So it got a drain-and-fill with synthetic (Mobil-1, same brand and weight that the Honda daily driver enjoys). After another six hours of use, it got another drain-and-fill. The oil that came out looked virtually identical to the oil that went in, plus it didn't us any oil at all this time. The original fill definitely carried some junk out, and break-in seems to be complete with no further particle contamination visible in the second drain. I don't think I'll get to 12 hours total time (TT) before it gets its third (end-of-season) oil change.

I'm also a fan of using stabilizer in all the fuel that goes in the tank. I run the carburertor dry after each use. That keeps gas from draining into the cylinder, washing the oil off the walls and diluting the oil in the sump.

The fuel tank is kept full during the season, then gets drained and run completely dry at the end of the season. The tank and cylinder get fogged with marine preservative for off-sesason storage. A lot of that caution/procedure comes from a few decades of boating, where the environment is similarly friendly to corrosion.
 

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Here is another thing to consider when it comes to changing oil. Oils now a days have ad packs in them, designed to be released and be effective, those ad packs have protective stuff in them. If you are changing the oil too soon, you are likely not getting the full benefit of the oil and what it has in it to help with lubrication and protection for the engine.
 

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"Oils nowadays have add packs in them, designed to be released and be effective, those ad packs have protective stuff in them. If you are changing the oil too soon, you are likely not getting the full benefit of the oil ..."

This is not really correct. True, if you change oil very frequently, it is a waste. But given the minimal sumps these one-lungers have, it's not a great deal of oil. Also, if you return your oil for recycling (as you should!) you are minimizing the already small amount of waste.

Additive packages (detergents, dispersants, antacids and anti-wear additives) are best/most-effective when they are newest ... and their effectiveness diminishes with time and use.
 

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I'd run a high zddp oil, any HDEO variant or HM oil
I've heard the same suggestion. To explain better, HM is High Mileage, unless I'm misunderstanding. I use Mobil 1 in my small engines, and I try to buy the High Mileage version when possible, since it has more ZDDP, which I understand can help lubricate the cam system.

Being realistic, it probably doesn't make any meaningful difference, and I realize this. But, as others said, it's a quart per year. A few dollars, for peace of mind, is worth something to me.

In reality, most small engines (owned by "normal" people :) ) probably get their oil changed with whatever is available, hopefully the right weight, maybe every several years if they're kinda lucky. So fretting about whether to use regular or synthetic for seasonal oil changes, or High Mileage, is probably not really a problem. Changing it regularly, and ensuring it's filled properly, probably puts you ahead of the curve already.

If you could only pick one or the other, I'd propose keeping fuel stabilizer in your gas all the time, over using synthetic oil. Avoiding carb problems can save quite a bit of headache, while synthetic is probably less of an "obvious" benefit. If your cylinder bore is wearing 10% quicker because of using conventional oil instead of synthetic, that's less noticeable than when your engine won't start because the carb is gummed up. I think synthetic is good, to be clear, but don't neglect your fuel either.
 
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