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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
it's not a snowblower, but it is 100% dyed in the wooled designed/made in USA vintage machinery, made at the same time while Ariens 10M's and Snowbirds were rolling off USA assembly lines, this was rolling off a GM assembly line.

it sold for $3,100 new. was lost in 1964. then popped up on Ebay, and sold for $226,000

fascinating story, for all you snowblower mechanics who appreciate vintage made in USA machinery. this is the kind of provenance and heritage you will never see in the type of machinery we are being sold today.

eBay Find of the Day: 1963 LeMans Tempest sells for $226,521

eBay Find of the Day: 1963 LeMans Tempest sells for $226,521


Chris Tutor
1963 Pontiac LeMans Tempest on eBay – Click above for high-res image gallery

The eBay auction for this 1963 Pontiac LeMans Tempest started out innocently enough. Obtained after owner died. Appears to have original interior but no motor, no transmission. Body has a little rust and some dents. There's stuff in the trunk, but no key to open it. Opening bid nine days ago was a mere $500. After one week, eBay seller 123ecklin will pocket $226,521 before auction fees. What happened between Day 1 and Day 9 is an amazing story.

The car's plexiglass windows, unusual suspension setup and a dash plate bearing the name of a racetrack tipped the owner to its racing history. But what he didn't know is that the car is one of only six 1963 Pontiac LeMans Tempest Super Duty coupes ever made. Hemmings recently did a story on the rare cars in which they listed all ever built. This one looks to have been driven by Stan Antlocer and was the fastest drag car in 1963 before disappearing.

Reading through the questions on the auction gives us reason to believe the seller truly didn't know the car's provenance. In his answers, he seems both surprised by the car's potential value as well as overwhelmed by the attention. He turned down an offer of $160,000 to end the auction early because he feared getting negative eBay feedback. That decision paid off. With only seven minutes remaining, the highest offer was $95,000. When the virtual gavel fell, eBayer ccsi2000 had bought a very rare, if a little rusty, LeMans for $226,521. Thanks for the tip, Trevor!
 

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Discussion Starter #2
after being restored, it showed up at car shows

 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
and was recently re-united with the original owner and driver, who had not seen it since 1964, for 50 years... and had been looking for it during the 1990's. ...
so next time you're working on your old 1960's American made snowblower, just imagine it's a Super Duty Pontiac in miniature.
because in a way, it is... it's from the same era, built with the same quality DNA.
American made from the boom years of the US post-war economy.

 

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Now that's a cool story! What a beautiful car. Ya' just gotta' love old iron. Thanks for sharing it.
 

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looks a lot like the 63/64 gto I was in accident with. I was a passenger- car was totaled. Very cool story.
 

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Very interesting story that brought back some fond memories. My first driving lesson was in a 64 Lemans with a 326 and a four speed. :D
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I had a '64 LeMans with straight 6/automatic 2 speed, blue with blue gut, bucket seats, and oddly enough it had a power drivers seat, and console/floor shift. paid $600 for it, drove it a while, sold it for $900.
should have kept it...
 

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Very good story. Od muscle cars were the coolest ever.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
my first car was a $100 1966 Pontiac Catalina. 389-2bbl 4 door. that darn thing would go...

in 11th grade was already working 30 hours/week after school/weekends, bringing home a whopping $68/week. bought a 1970 Chevelle Malibu 307/2bbl for $300. had it painted black for $300. put headers, mags, and bucket seats in it.
now the funny part...Dad didn't pay for it. I actually had a LOAN at the bank, and the payment was $45/month. drove the wheels off that car, for 3 years. sold it for $100, and they drove it away. it had like 130,000 on the clock. should have kept that one too...

I see most of today's kids, have no hands on mechanical skills, and don't know how machinery works. they are stuck in their social media iphones all day, pushing those little buttons. sad.

I see it in adults today too. they sit back and think about what they are going to buy next, rather than what they are going to actually produce, build, repair, or work on next, themselves. I don't understand the desire to be complacent, when there's so much interesting stuff to do.

when productivity leaves the general public, the society is on the downstroke...afraid to say. less and less people are actually producing today.
 

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My father had one. It was a Le Mans conv. They had a 326 V8 available, but he got the 4cyl with a 2 speed auto trans. It did have IRS and was good in the snow. When you jacked it up (gas pedal floored brakes on) the rear went down. Would have been much better with the 326.
 

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I like old Muscle cars as well but I doubt if I would like to ride on the original squirrelly handling Bias ply tires that came on these machines compared to the modern high performance Radial tires available today. There are a few people who are purists who will look to restore the car to exactly what was available for the vintage year it was made. I certainly do not dislike modern technology. In fact Motor trend compared 3 vintage muscle cars to their modern descendants today and the modern muscle cars were much better performance cars in that they out accelerated and out braked and out handled the older muscle cars all while getting 25 to 27mpg on the highway with modern 6 speed transmissions.
http://www.automotiveaddicts.com/20437/muscle-cars-old-versus-new
However many people will upgrade the suspension components with polyurethane bushings vs. the original rubber bushings and use modern radial tires which will offer improved handling over the vintage bias ply tires and modern rack and pinion steering which has been designed to fit into the older chassis. Also there are lots of people will buy modern electronic ignition crate engines that have ecu boxes to run as smooth as any new engine does today. I know a man who has a 1957 Chevy Bel Air Hard top that was restored by Chip Foose complete with the Foose wheels. It had modern suspension components in it with 4 wheel disc brakes and a modern Corvette LS7 V8 engine from 2006. He said that he likes to drive the car and he wants a reliable and enjoyable to drive high powered car with a custom leather interior which was done with air conditioning as well. He says the outer shell is a 57 Chevy Hardtop but underneath it is quite modern with modern engine management and a custom interior with modern air-conditioning and stereo. He even drives it to car shows and uses it often during the summer months only in Minnesota because of the road salt.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
I like old Muscle cars as well but I doubt if I would like to ride on the original squirrelly handling Bias ply tires that came on these machines compared to the modern high performance Radial tires available today. There are a few people who are purists who will look to restore the car to exactly what was available for the vintage year it was made. I certainly do not dislike modern technology. In fact Motor trend compared 3 vintage muscle cars to their modern descendants today and the modern muscle cars were much better performance cars in that they out accelerated and out braked and out handled the older muscle cars all while getting 25 to 27mpg on the highway with modern 6 speed transmissions.
http://www.automotiveaddicts.com/20437/muscle-cars-old-versus-new
However many people will upgrade the suspension components with polyurethane bushings vs. the original rubber bushings and use modern radial tires which will offer improved handling over the vintage bias ply tires and modern rack and pinion steering which has been designed to fit into the older chassis. Also there are lots of people will buy modern electronic ignition crate engines that have ecu boxes to run as smooth as any new engine does today. I know a man who has a 1957 Chevy Bel Air Hard top that was restored by Chip Foose complete with the Foose wheels. It had modern suspension components in it with 4 wheel disc brakes and a modern Corvette LS7 V8 engine from 2006. He said that he likes to drive the car and he wants a reliable and enjoyable to drive high powered car with a custom leather interior which was done with air conditioning as well. He says the outer shell is a 57 Chevy Hardtop but underneath it is quite modern with modern engine management and a custom interior with modern air-conditioning and stereo. He even drives it to car shows and uses it often during the summer months only in Minnesota because of the road salt.

great post...agreed. my first intro to radials was, someone gave my Dad 4 used Michelins, and I put them on the Chevelle as a kid. wow, what a difference, and the tires had very little life left for tread- but the ride/handling amazed me as a kid back in 1978. when I got a decent full time job and had more money, the next set of tires were all radials.

the tire technology is better today, given.
the cars in general do handle better too, and get better mileage.

in all out straight line performance, fully modded, the old cars have the edge, most of the time, because they had bigger engines in them, and stronger drivetrains.

the fastest Super Stock in NHRA to date is still the 426 Hemi Cuda, it still holds the records to this day.

in resale value, the old cars in good condition are a better investment as well. look what that LeMans sold for. the new cars will depreciate every year.

but I do like getting 200K miles out of the factory V6, with 20mpg city. would not want to be feeding gas to an old car getting 12-13mpg city. that's what my GTO and Firebird got. those old cars are just unaffordable to drive daily anymore, they eat too much fuel. the new FWD cars tend to be a lot better in the snow as well.

one thing I don't like about the newer cars, is all the plastic they use in the dash, door panels, interior, and under the hood trim, panels, etc. tends to make the cars look cheap- and that stuff cracks so easily.
the new ones are generally safer in an accident as well, esp. with the airbags.
 
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