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My neighbor loaned me this great little snowblower and it really opened my eyes as to how effortless it was to get rid of snow, I'm hooked and I liked the machine so much I want one just like it, it's a Craftsman model 71-52110-1 with a 10 HP Tecumseh. serial # 101651. he only paid $ 300 for this thing and it's in excellent shape, no rust, everything intact and working properly. electric start it starts great and plows right through compacted stuff left by the snowplow. I found this picture online it looks like the same machine. I'm wondering about parts availability, is it worth trying to find one of these?
 

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Welcome to SBF. Where's your location? How big an area do you need to clean? Just my humble opinion but you can do better for less, depending on your location.
 

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That's not a great quality machine (for the time--around 25+ years old) that stands out slightly because it has a large engine for its size. I'd really be looking at a better brand for that money. Around here $300 would buy a newer Ariens if you shopped around.
 

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My neighbor loaned me this great little snowblower and it really opened my eyes as to how effortless it was to get rid of snow, I'm hooked and I liked the machine so much I want one just like it, it's a Craftsman model 71-52110-1 with a 10 HP Tecumseh. serial # 101651. he only paid $ 300 for this thing and it's in excellent shape, no rust, everything intact and working properly. electric start it starts great and plows right through compacted stuff left by the snowplow. I found this picture online it looks like the same machine. I'm wondering about parts availability, is it worth trying to find one of these?
I don't see nothing wrong in buying a used machine like that one. I bought mine used (similar to the one pictures, decided to restore it but that was my choice to do so) and even if it's not a new 2020 model it gets the job done. I didn't feel like spending 2K or more for a new one and restoring my used one still ended up costing me less than buying a new one. There are some purists who only swear by Ariens, Honda, etc… :bs: but new or used, as long as it moves snow is what counts! :smile:
As for parts, I wouldn't worry too much as Craftsman sold thousands of them so finding used parts shouldn't be a problem and also some replacement parts are still available new.

Good luck, :thumbsup:

Claude.
 

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Just my opinion pertaining to buying quality when buying anything. Yes, a humble snowblower designed for cost will clear snow!!! No if’s or but’s.......they work. So you may ask, why then follow recommendations that advise paying more than that ‘’designed for cost’’ requires???

The simple answer in my humble opinion is reliability!!!! Even a brand name such as Ariens can cut product cost and for that reason when purchase time arrived for me, I went with their Pro 28 model. Why? Because I was fed up having to make repairs to my old ‘’designed for cost’’ snowblower in my freezing garage before I could clear my yard after a storm. Sure, if you intend to change out your machine every few years or so, the reliability of a better machine is of no consequence. What can fail? Every moving part! It reminds me of the old Fram filter advertisement: Pay me now, or pay me later.
 

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I think that reliability is closely linked to good maintenance. I've had a 1975 8hp. Lawn-Boy snowblower for 44 years ( ! ) and eventually gave it to my daughter when I bought my 2004 Brute and it still runs fine today. I always cared for it and when I saw something that needed attention, I immediately fixed it.. I think that's the key to make any brand last longer. As for my Brute, I completely restored it last fall and now it's as good as new so if it lasts another 44 years, I won't complain!… :biggrin:

Claude.
 

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Before pulling the trigger on any blower do a little homework. You never used one before and you don't have to run out now and grab the first one you see. Watch the video before buying anything. Donyboy73 knows what he's talking about.
 

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Parts no problem.

Craftsman? not sure about reliability. all I know that people around here can NOT give them away. see them free all the time or very very cheap. I won't take them in for repairs because the cost is more than it's worth.

If you can get one free and/or cheap go ahead. but try to learn to maintain and repair yourself and people here will more than happy to help.

I think you may be able to do better with $300-500 for a good used Ariens/Honda/Toro. It also depends on amount of snowfall you receive. A good single stage Toro or Honda will do an excellent job in smaller snowfalls and they can be had cheap in the summer. Whatever you decide , wait until spring/summer to pick up the best deals.
 

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I'd think pretty much any 26" snowblower with a 12" impeller and a 10 hp engine would be a good performer, would I specifically seek out that model? Probably not. Definitely not at $300.

I've rehabbed and flipped several newer Murray-made Craftsman snowblowers over the years, but only if they were dirt cheap to begin with ($0-$40) needing only a carb and skid shoes.
 

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Throwing out the welcome mat for your first post..
Greetings from Gettysburg!
 

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I think that reliability is closely linked to good maintenance. I've had a 1975 8hp. Lawn-Boy snowblower for 44 years ( ! ) and eventually gave it to my daughter when I bought my 2004 Brute and it still runs fine today. I always cared for it and when I saw something that needed attention, I immediately fixed it.. I think that's the key to make any brand last longer. As for my Brute, I completely restored it last fall and now it's as good as new so if it lasts another 44 years, I won't complain!… :biggrin:

Claude.

Sometimes ‘’good maintenance’’ requires CONSTANT maintenance. And there are many who enjoy doing constant maintenance and repairs. To each his own.
 

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My neighbor loaned me this great little snowblower and it really opened my eyes as to how effortless it was to get rid of snow, I'm hooked and I liked the machine so much I want one just like it, it's a Craftsman model 71-52110-1 with a 10 HP Tecumseh. serial # 101651. he only paid $ 300 for this thing and it's in excellent shape, no rust, everything intact and working properly. electric start it starts great and plows right through compacted stuff left by the snowplow. I found this picture online it looks like the same machine. I'm wondering about parts availability, is it worth trying to find one of these?
You are narrowing your choices dramatically while being so specific with an older machine.
After that..when you locate one...will it in good shape?
I think you will be happy with just about any machine compared to using a shovel.
There are many machines to choose both from new and used/ I would widen my search way beyond that machine in specific.




Sent from my LM-Q710.FG using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Welcome to SBF. Where's your location? How big an area do you need to clean? Just my humble opinion but you can do better for less, depending on your location.
Thanks for the welcome and advice, I'm in the southern Okanagan of British Columbia, the snow we get here is what I would call high maintenance in that it needs shoveling before you even walk on it cause everywhere you step turns to ice, in the 20 years we've lived here I've shoveled 16" of snow off the roof at least half a dozen times. below 0°C it's light powder and you need to get on it before it warms up and gets heavy, this last week it snowed for 4 days I couldn't keep up even after shoveling for 18 hours straight. such a PITA ! my driveway I want the snowblower for is 80' x 16'
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
That's not a great quality machine (for the time--around 25+ years old) that stands out slightly because it has a large engine for its size. I'd really be looking at a better brand for that money. Around here $300 would buy a newer Ariens if you shopped around.
Thanks for your advice, I do love those old Tecumseh engines, I have one in my lawnmower it's been running like a top for 35+ years !
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I don't see nothing wrong in buying a used machine like that one. I bought mine used (similar to the one pictures, decided to restore it but that was my choice to do so) and even if it's not a new 2020 model it gets the job done. I didn't feel like spending 2K or more for a new one and restoring my used one still ended up costing me less than buying a new one. There are some purists who only swear by Ariens, Honda, etc… :bs: but new or used, as long as it moves snow is what counts! :smile:
As for parts, I wouldn't worry too much as Craftsman sold thousands of them so finding used parts shouldn't be a problem and also some replacement parts are still available new.

Good luck, :thumbsup:

Claude.
Thanks for your advice, I think we're on the same page, If I can find a machine in good condition for a decent price and score a few more for parts I'll be happy with that.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Just my opinion pertaining to buying quality when buying anything. Yes, a humble snowblower designed for cost will clear snow!!! No if’s or but’s.......they work. So you may ask, why then follow recommendations that advise paying more than that ‘’designed for cost’’ requires???

The simple answer in my humble opinion is reliability!!!! Even a brand name such as Ariens can cut product cost and for that reason when purchase time arrived for me, I went with their Pro 28 model. Why? Because I was fed up having to make repairs to my old ‘’designed for cost’’ snowblower in my freezing garage before I could clear my yard after a storm. Sure, if you intend to change out your machine every few years or so, the reliability of a better machine is of no consequence. What can fail? Every moving part! It reminds me of the old Fram filter advertisement: Pay me now, or pay me later.
Can't say I blame you for being fed up with machines needing repair, I'm looking for a well designed reliable beast with a good parts supply, I remember those old Fram filter ads from years ago, turns out Fram filters are probably the worst one's on the market.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I think that reliability is closely linked to good maintenance. I've had a 1975 8hp. Lawn-Boy snowblower for 44 years ( ! ) and eventually gave it to my daughter when I bought my 2004 Brute and it still runs fine today. I always cared for it and when I saw something that needed attention, I immediately fixed it.. I think that's the key to make any brand last longer. As for my Brute, I completely restored it last fall and now it's as good as new so if it lasts another 44 years, I won't complain!… :biggrin:

Claude.
I would agree, if you take care of a well designed reliable machine it will stay reliable for a very long time, staying on top of small problems before they become big problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Before pulling the trigger on any blower do a little homework. You never used one before and you don't have to run out now and grab the first one you see. Watch the video before buying anything. Donyboy73 knows what he's talking about.
https://youtu.be/wFOVWb_QP5k
Funnily enough I just watched that video last week he's a good mechanic, he has some great stuff on chainsaws too.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Parts no problem.

Craftsman? not sure about reliability. all I know that people around here can NOT give them away. see them free all the time or very very cheap. I won't take them in for repairs because the cost is more than it's worth.

If you can get one free and/or cheap go ahead. but try to learn to maintain and repair yourself and people here will more than happy to help.

I think you may be able to do better with $300-500 for a good used Ariens/Honda/Toro. It also depends on amount of snowfall you receive. A good single stage Toro or Honda will do an excellent job in smaller snowfalls and they can be had cheap in the summer. Whatever you decide , wait until spring/summer to pick up the best deals.
Thanks for your advice, I'm open to any brand that's known to be reliable and has a good parts supply, the $ 300 my neighbor paid I thought was a good price but only compared to what others are asking, locally I've seen nothing for less than $ 600 and a machine similar to the Craftsman was $ 800 I'll be waiting for spring/summer no doubt.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I'd think pretty much any 26" snowblower with a 12" impeller and a 10 hp engine would be a good performer, would I specifically seek out that model? Probably not. Definitely not at $300.

I've rehabbed and flipped several newer Murray-made Craftsman snowblowers over the years, but only if they were dirt cheap to begin with ($0-$40) needing only a carb and skid shoes.
Thanks for your advice, you guys down south have an amazing supply of dirt cheap snow blowers I wish we had that here ! hopefully I'll find something if I keep digging around.
 
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