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Hey all, not much model info available in the add, but maybe those with more Ariens knowledge can answer if this might be worth grabbing and repowering with a Harbor Freight Predator?

Ariens Snowblower
 

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Hey all, not much model info available in the add, but maybe those with more Ariens knowledge can answer if this might be worth grabbing and repowering with a Harbor Freight Predator?

Ariens Snowblower
Yes, It is a really nice machine looks like a mid 1970's to Late 1970's Sno-throw. Since it is a 32 inch you could opt for a high powered Predator 346cc 11hp. The Predator 212cc would work but being 32 inches it may not be the beast you are looking for. I have 2 Predator powered Snowblowers MTD 22inch and a Montgomery Ward(Gilson) 26 inch and the Predator 212cc works great on both but 32 inches is very big so the original 8hp Tecumseh may have even been lacking there. It would work but at 32 inches it may not be the high powered machine with just the 212cc engine. The 346cc engine on the other hand would make for a real beast of a snow thrower
 

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Yes, It is a really nice machine looks like a mid 1970's to Late 1970's Sno-throw. Since it is a 32 inch you could opt for a high powered Predator 346cc 11hp. The Predator 212cc would work but being 32 inches it may not be the beast you are looking for. I have 2 Predator powered Snowblowers MTD 22inch and a Montgomery Ward(Gilson) 26 inch and the Predator 212cc works great on both but 32 inches is very big so the original 8hp Tecumseh may have even been lacking there. It would work but at 32 inches it may not be the high powered machine with just the 212cc engine. The 346cc engine on the other hand would make for a real beast of a snow thrower
Thanks Gusto I've seen your machines on y'tube-you have done excellent work sir. I may try and get this machine. If i do the upgraded 346 engine how close to bolt on would you think it would be? I saw a vid of a guy putting this on that took a bunch of work and another who slapped it on his jd726.?

I guess we'll all find out soon enough :)
 

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Thanks Gusto I've seen your machines on y'tube-you have done excellent work sir. I may try and get this machine. If i do the upgraded 346 engine how close to bolt on would you think it would be? I saw a vid of a guy putting this on that took a bunch of work and another who slapped it on his jd726.?

I guess we'll all find out soon enough :)


Well I looked at the mounting hole diagram for the HSK80 Tecumseh engine and it is the same as the HF Predator 212cc engine so to mount the 346cc engine you would need to get a plate of steel 3/16 of an inch or thicker and weld it or bolt it on to the frame and center it correctly. The Predator 212cc would bolt right on based on the engine diagram from above.
 

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Looks early to mid 70s to me. I did get an 11 HP Greyhound one a 24" late 70s Ariens so the engine should fit. Not sure if anything has changed between the 11 HP Greyhound and the 11 HP Predator. The Greyhound just barely fit as the holes had to be drilled right at the very edge of where the frame tilts for the handlebars. I also had to cut the top off the belt cover and rebuilt it a bit taller with some flashing. The crank is a bit higher in the bigger engines, plus I used a larger pulley.
 

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Yes, It is worth repowering. That machine looks to be a 1973 based on the location of the engagement lever. If you plan on having it as your main blower I would pay the extra money for the bigger motor and also take the time to do a full mechanical rework. Gear lube, bushings, belt, shoes, scraper bar, and friction wheel all on an as needed basis.

All that along with an impeller kit and I guarantee you people around here will be jealous that you have a 32" unit that is in beast mode. I know I will be.

Even if you go with the 212 cc you will have a solid unit. I'd bet with the 212 it will run like a new unit with respect to bogging. These old Ariens with a proper re-power are way better than a new machine with respect to how much of a load they can handle.

Also the chute control has 2 u-joints. I'm pretty sure this means that you will not have to relocate the chute control. Even if you do have to, with the 2 u-joint setup you should be able to locate the chute in a much more operator friendly position than if you only had a straight shaft.

And while you have me going, $50 is a steal for a 32" unit that only needs a repower. Around here that would last maybe an hour on craigslist (Because I'd buy it if by some miracle I saw the ad before the guys that repair and resell them do).
 

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Keep in mind that is a $200-$350 blower at most running with a new engine. No one will really care too much about your cheap harbor freight engine(just being honest and I feel the HF engines are somewhat of a bargin). I would check it over long and hard so you don't dive into a money/time pit. To think that everything was coming up tulips before the engine failure would be foolish. Might wanna consider if the gear case seals failed 20-30 years ago and its been running with low lube. I didn't even begin to consider if the drive disc bearings are beginning to fail or have failed...very difficult to tell with the motor blown. I had that exact blower and replaced those bearings and let me tell you, it was a bi tch... Do the math and you might wanna run it by your wife to see what she thinks about you buying a 43 plus year old snowblower that could end up costing time and money.

Engine- $140-$350(extended warranty)
New Jet Carb $8
Belts- $30
Impeller Bearing $15
Auger/alxe bushings $36
Skid Shoes $25
New Scraper Bar $15
Friction Disc $18
Misc Fasteners $ 5
2-6hours labor $100
Blower $50
 

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Thats a 72 or 73 . I would put lct engine on that one , I think small engine whare house has them on sale. or even a kohler
 

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Keep in mind that is a $200-$350 blower at most running with a new engine. No one will really care too much about your cheap harbor freight engine(just being honest and I feel the HF engines are somewhat of a bargin). I would check it over long and hard so you don't dive into a money/time pit. To think that everything was coming up tulips before the engine failure would be foolish. Might wanna consider if the gear case seals failed 20-30 years ago and its been running with low lube. I didn't even begin to consider if the drive disc bearings are beginning to fail or have failed...very difficult to tell with the motor blown. I had that exact blower and replaced those bearings and let me tell you, it was a bi tch... Do the math and you might wanna run it by your wife to see what she thinks about you buying a 43 plus year old snowblower that could end up costing time and money.

Engine- $140-$350(extended warranty)
New Jet Carb $8
Belts- $30
Impeller Bearing $15
Auger/alxe bushings $36
Skid Shoes $25
New Scraper Bar $15
Friction Disc $18
Misc Fasteners $ 5
2-6hours labor $100
Blower $50
I am very very very much against using Harbor Freight engines, so I usually dont respond to these Harbor Freight engine threads at all..but this time im going to make an exception, to give another opinion relating to Tick's list of possible repairs..

Yes, its possible the snowblower will need some other things done, besides the engine..but it will most likely need zero, one, maybe two things off of that list..(and needing zero things is actually very common..My 1971 Ariens needed no new engine, and absolutely nothing off of that list..I bought the machine for $250, and 5 years later, the only thing I have bought for it was a $15.00 carb kit..)



So its quite likely your list could look like this:

Snowblower - $50
Engine - $150
Zero, one or two things off of Ticks list.

You can end up with a snowblower worth $250 by spending about $250, most likely less..
even if you spent $300, it would still be worthwhile, because you would end up with a machine of FAR higher quality
than many brand-new snowblowers (except for the engine)..but the engine should last a few years..so its still worth it..

yes, it *might* need more work that that..its possible..but its actually more likely it will need very little work, than it will need a lot of work..the photos show everything is most likely in fine shape..

Doing these kinds of refurbs on older machines is always a gamble..
but for $50, IMO you cant go wrong..
even if you buy it, inspect it, find out it has more wrong with it than you initially thought, you can always sell it again for $50..just do a through inspection *before* you get the new engine..if you do it that way, $50 is a no-risk investment..

but based on most peoples experience with theses 1970's ariens machines, it wont need a lot..and it will NEVER need everything on Ticks list..
(not this particular machine anyway..based on the photos..)

Scot
 

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Determining the 'worth' of the effort is subjective. It depends on your intentions and how you measure 'worth' (financially, emotionally, educationally). There really is no right or wrong answer.

Restoring my machines to operational status has given me gratification knowing that I have saved another iconic machine from the scrap yard. Plus, I have learned a lot in the process. To me, that makes it all worthwhile.
 

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If the OP is going to buy it, put a brand spanking new engine on it and maybe an idler or ... and he'll end up with a really well built blower with a new engine that should dig him out of almost anything. He is a happy camper. If he uses it for five years and then sells it he'll likely recover most of his money and has had a reliable monster to clear snow.

I don't think he's looking for a rebuild to resell, he's looking for something to save his back and that's a very good platform to re-power no matter what he chooses for an engine.
When you put new on used you loose a lot of the new parts value. It isn't about resale as much as it is about having a good snow blower with a big enough engine the 32" auger isn't bogging down. I'd buy it but I'd put a 10hp + on it. I don't see from running my 32" Craftsman how a 6.5 hp would work very well unless you were willing to just crawl :( most of the time.
 

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Let me repeat that for $50 that machine is a steal. Auger bushings are cheap and very, very easy to change out. Wheel bushings are likely to be a pain if they need to be done because the hubs are usually frozen on to the axle.

If you are looking for this machine for personal use than you will end up with a fantastic machine even if it is worth only what you put into it. If you tried to sell a 32 inch ariens with a new motor and zero deficiencies for $300 (212 cc) or $400 (11 hp) you "might" get that, but if you wanted to find one for that price you would have your work cut out for you.

Also finding a donor tractor or bucket section is not that hard to do on this setup (as long as you will settle for a 24" bucket). so there is less risk than you think of something breaking and your investment being wasted.

My '73 ariens that I restored only needed 1 auger bushing and of course a repower. I'd do the gear lube no matter what.

If I blew out my gear case the easiest thing to do would be to swap in a new bucket section.

Check the shoes, scraper bar, and if you can take off the bottom plate and look at the friction wheel setup. Also chech for excessive play in the wheel and auger bushings. (auger bushings are not a deal breaker as they are as easy to change as the skid shoes).
 

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I'm with Scripper77, I'd grab it as I doubt you'd be unhappy with the end result. It's a gas cutting and blowing 32" of snow. You don't want to have anything in the way of that discharge unless it's your rude neighbors car and you can bury it in seconds :D
 

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Discussion Starter #14


Well I looked at the mounting hole diagram for the HSK80 Tecumseh engine and it is the same as the HF Predator 212cc engine so to mount the 346cc engine you would need to get a plate of steel 3/16 of an inch or thicker and weld it or bolt it on to the frame and center it correctly. The Predator 212cc would bolt right on based on the engine diagram from above.
This is great stuff thank you Gusto.

Determining the 'worth' of the effort is subjective. It depends on your intentions and how you measure 'worth' (financially, emotionally, educationally). There really is no right or wrong answer.

Restoring my machines to operational status has given me gratification knowing that I have saved another iconic machine from the scrap yard. Plus, I have learned a lot in the process. To me, that makes it all worthwhile.
I think this sums up my intentions for this machine. It is actually planned to be used for my business parking lot a 6 car lot and drive to my agency. I depended upon a local guy to plow for me and he has been less than reliable so I want to have some fun saving an older machine (why? because I can) and something that will out last the tin foil machines of today. I know this position kind of undermines my idea to use the Harbor Freight engine :rolleyes: but a 2 year warranty and good testimonials about power and reliability sealed the deal to try it. I know it's not "correct" for th emodel and for esthetics but I am not building a show queen or intending to resell it. I want a reliable war horse to launch the snow as off the lot in the least amount of time as possible. :D

I am very blessed to have so much input and information from you all. I have been a long time active member over at www.mytractorforum.com as "GTP" on that site and have rebuilt and saved many lawnboys, toros and other small engines so i don't think this will be too far above my head (and if it is in places I am sure someone on here can talk me through the problem).

Thank you all for the warm welcome and advice. I hope to save this machine and give it new life.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I am very very very much against using Harbor Freight engines, so I usually dont respond to these Harbor Freight engine threads at all..but this time im going to make an exception, to give another opinion relating to Tick's list of possible repairs..

Yes, its possible the snowblower will need some other things done, besides the engine..but it will most likely need zero, one, maybe two things off of that list..(and needing zero things is actually very common..My 1971 Ariens needed no new engine, and absolutely nothing off of that list..I bought the machine for $250, and 5 years later, the only thing I have bought for it was a $15.00 carb kit..)



So its quite likely your list could look like this:

Snowblower - $50
Engine - $150
Zero, one or two things off of Ticks list.

You can end up with a snowblower worth $250 by spending about $250, most likely less..
even if you spent $300, it would still be worthwhile, because you would end up with a machine of FAR higher quality
than many brand-new snowblowers (except for the engine)..but the engine should last a few years..so its still worth it..

yes, it *might* need more work that that..its possible..but its actually more likely it will need very little work, than it will need a lot of work..the photos show everything is most likely in fine shape..

Doing these kinds of refurbs on older machines is always a gamble..
but for $50, IMO you cant go wrong..
even if you buy it, inspect it, find out it has more wrong with it than you initially thought, you can always sell it again for $50..just do a through inspection *before* you get the new engine..if you do it that way, $50 is a no-risk investment..

but based on most peoples experience with theses 1970's ariens machines, it wont need a lot..and it will NEVER need everything on Ticks list..
(not this particular machine anyway..based on the photos..)

Scot
This is encouraging...If the stock engine wasn't dead I'd probably be doing the same thing. But it's been my experince that i give it a good once over replace what needs done, run it and update as I go. I could go nuts and replace everything right away (which I have done in the past) but lessons learned. Thanks for the advice!
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)

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This is great stuff thank you Gusto.



I think this sums up my intentions for this machine. It is actually planned to be used for my business parking lot a 6 car lot and drive to my agency. I depended upon a local guy to plow for me and he has been less than reliable so I want to have some fun saving an older machine (why? because I can) and something that will out last the tin foil machines of today. I know this position kind of undermines my idea to use the Harbor Freight engine :rolleyes: but a 2 year warranty and good testimonials about power and reliability sealed the deal to try it. I know it's not "correct" for th emodel and for esthetics but I am not building a show queen or intending to resell it. I want a reliable war horse to launch the snow as off the lot in the least amount of time as possible. :D

I am very blessed to have so much input and information from you all. I have been a long time active member over at www.mytractorforum.com as "GTP" on that site and have rebuilt and saved many lawnboys, toros and other small engines so i don't think this will be too far above my head (and if it is in places I am sure someone on here can talk me through the problem).

Thank you all for the warm welcome and advice. I hope to save this machine and give it new life.
Use a good synthetic especially if you are going to be blowing in a commercial snow removal business. I use Amsoil and it is a great synthetic oil. Other have used Mobil 1 or Castrol Syntec and they are all better than cheap non synthetic oils. Amsoil has a much stronger film strength and the only thing that keep the metal off the metal is a thin layer of oil between it and Amsoil had the smallest 4 ball wear test scar among all oils tested. I have a snowmobile with 7900 miles now that broke a bearing at 7200 miles and the cyliders were still within specs acording to electronic caliper measurements. No overbore for m engine just new piston rings and a light ball hone. Now that is a good example of how good the lubricating properties of Amsoil is.

Four Ball Wear (ASTM D-4172)
The Four Ball Wear Test determines the wear protection properties of a lubricant. Three metal balls are clamped together and covered with the test lubricant, while a rotating fourth ball is pressed against them in sliding contact. This contact typically produces a wear scar, which is measured and recorded. The smaller the average wear scar, the better the wear protection provided by the lubricant. As shown in the graph, AMSOIL Synthetic 10W-30 Motor Oil produced the smallest wear scar of the tested lubricants.

I have 317,000 miles on my Hyundia Elantra and it still runs great. I took it to Yellowstone and Glacier National park last summer even.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Use a good synthetic especially if you are going to be blowing in a commercial snow removal business. I use Amsoil and it is a great synthetic oil. Other have used Mobil 1 or Castrol Syntec and they are all better than cheap non synthetic oils. Amsoil has a much stronger film strength and the only thing that keep the metal off the metal is a thin layer of oil between it and Amsoil had the smallest 4 ball wear test scar among all oils tested. I have a snowmobile with 7900 miles now that broke a bearing at 7200 miles and the cyliders were still within specs acording to electronic caliper measurements. No overbore for m engine just new piston rings and a light ball hone. Now that is a good example of how good the lubricating properties of Amsoil is.

Four Ball Wear (ASTM D-4172)
The Four Ball Wear Test determines the wear protection properties of a lubricant. Three metal balls are clamped together and covered with the test lubricant, while a rotating fourth ball is pressed against them in sliding contact. This contact typically produces a wear scar, which is measured and recorded. The smaller the average wear scar, the better the wear protection provided by the lubricant. As shown in the graph, AMSOIL Synthetic 10W-30 Motor Oil produced the smallest wear scar of the tested lubricants.

I have 317,000 miles on my Hyundia Elantra and it still runs great. I took it to Yellowstone and Glacier National park last summer even.
No need to sell me on Amsoil i've used it for years! My toyota avalon 300,000 miles and going strong-i drive it every day 54 miles and to VA and DC regulary. I'd drink Amsoil myself if it tasted a little better.

I also use Legend ZX2SR racing oil in all my two stroke machines. It has unbelieveable shear and lubrication properties for two cycle engines and it is not a synthetic and was the only oil to survive a 16,000 rpm torture test in a sled engine. These two oils are the ONLY thing i ever have used.

What did you break the new HF engine in on dino oil or the Amsoil? I always used a natural dino based oil like castrol to break the new engines or rebuilds in on for the first few hours then went to Amsoil. Legend is natural dino based so all my two strokes get it from the beginning.

Thanks Gusto!
 

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No need to sell me on Amsoil i've used it for years! My toyota avalon 300,000 miles and going strong-i drive it every day 54 miles and to VA and DC regulary. I'd drink Amsoil myself if it tasted a little better.

I also use Legend ZX2SR racing oil in all my two stroke machines. It has unbelieveable shear and lubrication properties for two cycle engines and it is not a synthetic and was the only oil to survive a 16,000 rpm torture test in a sled engine. These two oils are the ONLY thing i ever have used.

What did you break the new HF engine in on dino oil or the Amsoil? I always used a natural dino based oil like castrol to break the new engines or rebuilds in on for the first few hours then went to Amsoil. Legend is natural dino based so all my two strokes get it from the beginning.

Thanks Gusto!
I have broke my minibike in on a synthetic blend then at about 3 hours use I change the oil in put in a full synthetic. My last Predator engine I just put Amsoil in and never used a non synthetic. I heard that they will still break in albeit more slowly since the synthetic is much more slippery than the non synthetics. On my snowmobile I ran a synthetic mix then switched it over to Amsoil to help to seat the rings. Pretty cool that a 7200 mile Polaris Xlt cylinder wall are still with in specs according to the calipers they used.:D
 

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I'm with ckipper and Kiss4..) If planning on using that machine will run better or at least with the best of them. Many 60's Ariens still going. Unfortanately your average non-OPE homeowner looks at the 'age' rather than the quality or the reputation. So that said: If fixing to sell, be wise on how much you put into it.. But if fixing to use for yourself- Go with a new motor (I'd look at a briggs) and replace everything needed (belts/shoes/bearings,ect) and you'll have a blower that will last until your a old man. Far better option than a new box store off brand. Nice clean unit and you'll love the 32" (I've had many, and the 32"is not not easy to find for sale. once people realize the quality and how well they work regarding the old Ariens Sno-thro's they don't want to sell them)- have fun
 
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