Snowblower Forum banner

1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I changed the engine oil towards the end of last season, topping it up to bring it level with the filler neck hole (as per instructions).


In early autumn I drove the machine outside and gave it a general lube, brush-up and treated a couple of rust patches. When I unscrewed the filler cap, I noticed some engine oil overflow out of the filler neck. I thought this must be because the oil had expanded a bit during the summer and didn't think much about it.


The machine wasn't used until today. It was around -5°C (23°F) in the store. The blower was parked on a level surface and I checked the oil level before start-up. Again oil glugged out of the filler hole.



Any ideas?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Oh dear, that sounds serious.


The machine is <1 year old. Any pointers on how I can confirm that it's the carb/needle seating? And whether this is an "easy DIY fix" or whether it should go in for service?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,036 Posts
I assume it still has warranty on it and even if it doesn't a machine as nice as that should go to the dealer so factory quality parts are used for the repair. It may be something that they have seen before and should know the correct procedure to repair it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I collected some of the overflowing oil and it didn't smell like fuel.


But I will still be contacting the local Yamaha dealer to get her booked in. Not the best time of year though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,215 Posts
I doubt there's anything wrong with your engine. I think you just overfilled it when you did the oil change. Engine has to be level when you fill it to the mark on the dip stick. It is easy to overfill if the auger mouth is lifted a bit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
@Coby7 I appreciate your comment but I'm pretty sure I was level when I did the oil change.


I have read some boating forum information and it seems Yamaha has had issues with "making oil", at least on those marine engines. It seems the rings were not seating properly. No idea if that could be a similar problem here, or whether it's as Mr Gibbs originally suggested.


For one reason and another, I'm wondering whether I should try a fresh oil change and monitor the unit closely over a few hours running. The local Yamaha dealer isn't exactly the best there is (couldn't be bothered to even quote for a new machine which meant I bought elsewhere, and later when I visisted the service desk they refused to order the "Yamalube" specified in the manual, on the basis that he would need to order "a pack of 12"). So I'm not exactly enthusiastic about dealing with them..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,431 Posts
It may be that your machine is not completely broken in yet and rings have not seated completely, but rings are not going to create more oil in the engine.

Did you store your machine with gas in the tank over the summer? Was there any gas left in the tank when you started it during your maintenance work or had the gas mysteriously disappeared from the tank. Does your machine have a fuel shutoff valve? If it does was it closed? If it does not have a shutoff valve, I would suggest you install one.

You might want to try changing the oil again, and making sure that you close off the fuel valve so that in case the needle in the carb is leaking, the leak will be prevented with the fuel valve closed. I always close the valve on my machine, and then let it run until the gas in the carb is used up and it stops by itself.

You also want to used conventional oil for the full amount of time specified in the manual for the break in period. Do not use synthetic until the engine is fully broken in.

If you have a warranty on the machine that is still in effect, then you need to refer the problem to the dealer to be corrected. If you tamper too much with the machine trying to diagnose the problem, your dealer might decline to do warranty work due to the tampering.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,288 Posts
It's over filled
Change it again and add manually until full not the amount the spec calls for and see how much it takes
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
405 Posts
I doubt there's anything wrong with your engine. I think you just overfilled it when you did the oil change. Engine has to be level when you fill it to the mark on the dip stick. It is easy to overfill if the auger mouth is lifted a bit.
Yeah....I agree, too much oil. But go back to the OP's thread where he states:

''I changed the engine oil towards the end of last season, topping it up to bring it level with the filler neck hole (as per instructions).''


I have never ever seen that much oil required in an engine. Maybe he has an engine that has such requirements but...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
@skutflut Thanks for super advice.


Did you store your machine with gas in the tank over the summer? Was there any gas left in the tank when you started it during your maintenance work or had the gas mysteriously disappeared from the tank.



Actually I thought I stored it full but it wasn't full when I checked in autumn. That was puzzling me and I was doubting my memory...



Does your machine have a fuel shutoff valve? If it does was it closed?

Yes and yes :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Yeah....I agree, too much oil. But go back to the OP's thread where he states:

''I changed the engine oil towards the end of last season, topping it up to bring it level with the filler neck hole (as per instructions).''


I have never ever seen that much oil required in an engine.

Page 45 of the user manual. Feel free to expand your own knowledge by checking out the picture above the text, "Correct engine oil level". :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,215 Posts
I believe the problem lies with one phrase in that picture. "Warm up the engine for several minutes"
Now if I remember correctly oil expands with heat, so if you fill it to the line with cold oil and then start the engine to check it you can be sure of one thing oil is going to flow out of the crank case no question. When I filled mine with this in mind I didn't fill to the top, I just filled to the first mark on the dip stick which is about a ½" from the top and after running it, it still flowed oil from the filler neck. Let it flow out, you now have the right amount in the crankcase.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,288 Posts
what he said coby7 said
kinda hard to over fill that style plug mine is right to the brim on the414cc its fine
notice no difference cold or warm other then complete drain back cold
if you have no gas leaking in your set
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
I believe the problem lies with one phrase in that picture. "Warm up the engine for several minutes"
Now if I remember correctly oil expands with heat, so if you fill it to the line with cold oil and then start the engine to check it you can be sure of one thing oil is going to flow out of the crank case no question.

The "warm up the engine for several minutes" does not appear in my user manual. It instructs an oil check before start-up, and shows that same picture to indicate that the level should be in line with the filling spout lip.


The picture you're showing is from the workshop manual and I think they've screwed up the descriptions on that page. The two main mistakes they have made are:


1. No need to warm up engine before checking oil level.
2. No need to replace O-ring and filler cap when you've simply been checking the oil level.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
953 Posts
Pretty much the same fill procedure that was used on L head Tecumsehs pretty much forever . . .and almost impossible to get wrong without significant effort . . .
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Top